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What not…

Much has been said and much has been written about what makes great leaders and effective sales managers.  One of my readers John McCall, offers us stellar coaching from another perspective – what not to do.

It’s a rare person who wants to hear what he doesn’t want to hear.

Dick Cavett

I trust leaders and sales managers will benefit from this synopsis of John’s coaching points:

10 Sales Management Sins that Kill Sales Morale and Performance

  1. Ignoring what’s been working… 

Sales organizations can benefit from an infusion of new ideas and even new management. However, a common misstep is to discount the institutional memory and the very people that helped to build the organization’s revenue stream in the first place. 

  2. Cancelling meetings last minute… 

Every time a call or a meeting is cancelled at the last minute, the sales manager’s ignorance about the value of his salespeople’s schedule shows. This act sends two other signals:

      • Coaching time with my reps is not a priority.
      • As your sales manager I am overwhelmed and can’t manage my own schedule. 

  3. Treating salespeople like an expense…

Tinkering with commission plans; arbitrarily raising quotas; limiting incentives and you’re now speeding down a slippery slope.  So is your chance of hitting the company’s sales objectives; all to “save” a little. 

  4. Unfair comparisons 

All salespeople are different. While they undoubtedly share key sales-athlete traits like determination, self-motivation, and persuasiveness, they act and sell differently.  If sales management strips them of their uniqueness’s by categorizing them unfairly against their peers, resentment in the sales ranks accumulates faster than snow in Buffalo. 

  5. Playing favorites 

For a variety of reasons sales managers will sometimes favor certain salespeople and extend them privileges in multiple forms (i.e. leads, praise, promotions).  Never going unnoticed, other salespeople speculate about the motivations and the extent of the favoritism – and they despise it.

  6. Compensating unfairly for comparable roles 

The minute two peer salespeople learn one is compensated much better than the other for an equivalent job level you have a problem that jeopardizes retention – of both.

  7. Siphoning deals 

“Unassigned” Accounts (aka “ghost” or “house” accounts) can be a sales management sin. Trust is broken and your reps stop fighting for you.   After all, why would they when you aren’t fighting for them? 

  8. Hijacking a meeting 

New sales managers are hired to take control and run things better. The dividing line is the well earned relationship the salesperson has built up with his clients.  Overzealous sales managers often swoop in and control meetings where the conversation and the established relationship get hijacked. 

  9. Punishing in public 

Don’t do it – ‘nough said.

10. Labeling a sales rep with legitimate concerns as a whiner 

Dave the sales guy contemplates for months his idea of approaching sales management about things that could be improved to drive the company’s sales performance. He talks to his peers. He weighs the pros and cons. Then he schedules time with the Sales VP and tactfully but unashamedly points out ways things could be done better.  The Sales VP acknowledges his concerns, expresses appreciation for the candid feedback then does exactly nothing and labels Dave a problem to be dealt with. 

We can all do better by not doing what we shouldn’t be doing while leading our teams, yes?  Thanks for the coaching John!  He also offered What to do, which I will post next.

GAP

 

Did you like this little ditty?  You might enjoy my website and book, too:  The Peace & Power of a Positive Perspective© Please check it out.

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