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Boat floating…

Last week I wrote about Annual Achievement Planning.  Planning is one thing; now comes the achieving part.  Motivation is a good place to start, yes?

Careful though, individual motivation is quite personal.  For me, recognition floats my boat.  For you, it might be a promotion or an office.  If you manage a team, how do you motivate while avoiding a “one-size-fits-all” approach?

Here are excerpts of Tim Houlihan’s thoughts (see “Don’t show me the money”) published in Sales & Marketing Management ©:

A few months ago, I was in Denver and met a retired man who asked about my work. I told him I research the motivational effectiveness of different types of rewards. He held up a worn leather bag and said with a smile, “I was a sales rep and this was my first reward for winning a sales contest in 1967.” He beamed at the accomplishment made over 50 years ago.

When it comes to motivation, our brains know deep down what we’ll do with a bonus check: pay off a credit card or replace the water heater. There’s no joy and no motivation in that. Motivation comes from a new TV or a vacation, especially if it’s a reward.

Don’t show them the money, show them the vacation, show them the new bling. Focus your incentive spend so reps have unforgettable experiences — not just a paid-off credit card. High performers are motivated by things and trips, not cash.

I had a unique motivational experience in 2016, receiving “on stage” recognition:

Unfortunately, my last name was misspelled turning a boat floating opportunity into, “Misspelled?  Really?!”

That certificate hangs in my cube as motivation; reflecting my potential job security.  Such “one-size-fits-all; let’s not bother to check the spelling of his name” example reminds me of the, “Here today; forgotten tomorrow” realities of today’s workplace.

In the sales profession, much has been said and much has been written about the role money plays in motivation.  Money actually fits that impersonal, “one-size-fits-all” category mentioned above.  In the real world, money doesn’t float sales reps’ boats the way many people think it does.  Personal motivation is not that simple.

Here’s another excerpt from BI Worldwide also published in Sales & Marketing Management © (see “Nudging Sales Reps”):

While it can be intuitive to believe the risk-loving nature and generally high confidence of sales reps would lead to both high goal selection and high goal achievement, research is proving otherwise.

Risk-loving?  High confidence?  Research suggests maybe not.

What if sales reps aren’t these made-up, Hollywood, gun-slinging personas?  What if we’re just average people working in a career where individual performance dictates our income, our outcomes, and our very job security?  What if it’s a symbol of accomplishment in the face of job uncertainty that floats our boat? A leather bag; a paper certificate?

What if a bonus or a commission – minus taxes of course – just blends into our direct deposit for a week, and then it’s spent; gone; forgotten?

Looking beyond stereotypes and following credible research we find motivation originates from sources more powerful than mere money.  However, these sources are personal.  For managers, they’re hard to leverage; they aren’t “one-size-fits-all”; but they’re there.  And when we’re motivated – we will “run through walls” to achieve!

Today’s research is sales-oriented.  Yet, if sales reps are truly mere mortals; just average people risking income and job security on quota performance; then these principles apply to any person and every position, true?

What will float your boat in 2018?

GAP

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One Comment


  1. Nancy B
    Jan 10, 2018

    LOVED this!
    Glad I’m back on your list as I look forward to your thoughts!
    I’m passing this along to Jason as what motivates his players is also different with each one.

    Have a great day!

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