TheQuoteGuys

The Peace & Power of a Positive Perspective

Connect

Research or opinion…

Information on an infographic from InsideSales.com caught my attention (InsideSales.com/BeExtraordinary).

We should treat research carefully, true?  On the one hand, I was once told that without data we’re just some guy with an opinion. On the other hand Cicero, Consul of the Roman Republic (and a man whose opinions ultimately led to his death) offered:

It seems to me that no soothsayer should be able to look at another soothsayer without laughing.

So with a disclaimer in mind that I know InsideSales.com has something to sell…  I still believe their research is worthwhile.  Here are a few highlights that are definitely not “OK”:

Only 43% of sales reps reach quota attainment

Only 28.1% of closed deals are predicted accurately 90 days out

Reps only spend 36.6% of their time on revenue-generating activities

82% of B2B decision-makers think sales reps are unprepared

This isn’t the only market research I’ve read that shows less than 50% sales reps are attaining quota and B2B decision makers think sales rep suck. (OK, my interpretation of their opinion.)  Who is accountable for this poor performance and negative opinions?

Let’s examine sales rep performance.  Does your company publish quota standings for all your reps?  And whether you do or don’t, is the idea of publishing sales performance a good idea or a bad idea?  I mean the peer pressure could add to sales rep accountability.  But is this approach to accountability good or bad?

Hmm, the accountability question brings this adage to my mind that I first heard from Russ DeLoach, then Senior Vice President of Sales for ADP’s Major Accounts segment:

Where you stand on an issue has a lot to do with where you sit.

When I sold for ADP’s National Accounts segment; and then led sales teams in Colorado and Utah for ADP’s Major Accounts segment, we received weekly sales performance reports – stack ranked – for every person in a sales role in the nation.  Rep; manager; executive; “no place to hide”; weekly!

Everyone, and I mean everyone, saw who was selling and who was not.  Those with a competitive mindset took the spur (or the sugar cube) to heart and strived to elevate their performance.  Others, well…

What do you think?  Is this approach to sales accountability appropriate for the 21st century?  Does your company follow this opinion?  Or are you thinking it’s too much?

Personally I believe, “winners keep score”.  But that’s just one man’s opinion.  There is research however, by Tanner Corbridge; How Positive Accountability Can Make Employees Happier at Work to suggest employees prefer accountability.

I’m aligned with Tanner’s point #1 about holding ourselves accountable vs. undo attention to others’ accountability.  He put it this way:

It’s extremely rare for an employee – or even a manager – to admit anything along the lines of “I’m a train wreck. Don’t count on me for much.”

I also believe in point #2 that “employee ownership” requires “employee responsibility”.  And point #3 is the force-multiplier; working for a meaningful cause.

I don’t mean a social impact cause that’s so popular these days.  Yes, social responsibility is a key value that I participate in too.  But what good does it do for employees to be socially engaged if their company goes poof because of poor performance.

So count me in on the personal accountability theme.  Stack rank me; push me; I’m accountable for my responsibilities.  This works for me and is best for the success of my company.  At least, that’s my opinion.  What’s yours?

GAP

Did you like this little ditty?  You might enjoy my past posts too: www.TheQuoteGuys.com

Tags: , ,

Leave a Reply