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Smells like money…

Denver’s National Western Stock Show & Rodeo closed out its 113th consecutive year last weekend.  If you’ve never been, it’s definitely a must see.  I love being around western folk; American pride; tradition; and the values derived from hard work.  I love the smell of the barn.  For me, it’s motivational when dealing with the stress of today’s “modern” society.

I have written before about my favorite ritual when immersed in the tensions of life’s highs and lows; successes and failures – shoveling horse manure.  Yep, shoveling horse manure (in the pasture, not at the office) really has a calming effect on me.  I know most folks have a different ritual or approach when dealing with their ups and downs.

Nonetheless, business professionals can gain great benefit from ranchers, farmers, cowboys, English riders, and livestock.  For instance, if you own or even lease a horse, you know how motivational it can be.  Thinking about the price of hay alone gets me up and at ‘em in the morning!  Serves me right, I suppose, for ignoring the advice of our favorite, Unknown Sage who tells us:

Seymore’s Investment Principle:

Never invest in anything that eats.

And my corollary:

GAP‘s Reaction to Seymore’s Investment Principle:

Never buy anything that eats while you sleep.

Horses – smells like money alright.  Better get up and go sell somebody something today!

Speaking of sales, understanding a horse’s behavior is also beneficial to our profession because our prospects act a lot like horses.  For instance, if we’re not careful, we can spook our prospects.  And when we do, they cut and run and we never seem to catch them again, do we.  Spooking, aka “No decision”, is our biggest competitor.

I believe prospects act a lot like herd animals.  They shy from sales people and fear being “cut-out from the herd”, yes?  You probably have faced every excuse in the book when a prospect does not want to meet with you 1-on-1, even for a straight-forward; 30-minute; business conversation.

I was working with a team of sales professionals recently and suggested that even a prospect’s objections can have herd characteristics.  First, the prospect objects to our proposed price; then they don’t like our contract language; then it’s our payment terms; and then they want to delay order placement.  Before you know it we get stampeded by a whole herd of objections!

We can learn a lot from English style, hunter-jumper riders, too.  If you’ve ever watched those riders you know that as they approach each jump, they reach a critical, “Go” or “No Go” point, before the horse must leap.

Indecision on the part of the rider or the horse (or a prospect) can lead to a “train wreck”.  It’s another cross-over example of the great benefit sales professionals and business leaders can gain from horses:

Half the failures of this world in life arise from pulling in one’s horse as he is leaping.

Julius and Augustus Hare

Of course, western pleasure style riders don’t usually mix well with English style riders.  Come from different herds I suppose.  But whether western or English, it’s the horses, not the riding style; we learn important business lessons from.  If you are a sales leader and hear one of your sales reps complain about the difficulties of making his/her quota; their problems with a prospect; or pain they feel from losing a deal; you might offer this equestrian-oriented advice:

Cowboy-Up!

Or if you prefer:

English-Up!

Perseverance – like manure – smells like money.

GAP

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Highs and lows …

Welcome to the New Year!  Does this “new year” feel a lot like “last year”?  And if last year wasn’t a “great year”, what will that do to our outlook?  It can be easy to find oneself in a rut, true?  Ruts present us with the proverbial crossroad:

The only difference between a rut and a grave is depth.

Unknown Sage

One option is to work our way out of said rut.  Yes, yes, often easier said than done.

On the other hand, was last year your best year ever?  Did you experience an unbelievably successful event?  The highest of highs?  Getting too jacked up on something can also have detrimental impacts.  I mean, not every year can top the previous year forever, can it?  Besides, we may have been more lucky than good:

Successful people are incredibly delusional about their achievements.  Over 95 percent of the members in most successful groups believe that they perform in the top half of their group.  While this is statistically ridiculous, it is psychologically real. 

Marshall Goldsmith

Even when we truly are that good, if we’re not careful past success can put us on a road towards failure:

I once heard someone joke that the road to success is marked with many tempting parking places. 

Harvey Mackay

Finding that channel between being too low and too high seems to be the key to continued success don’t you think?  Steady improvement; balance; long-term growth; patience and persistence in the face of occasional set-backs; that’s what many strive to maintain.

Sometimes we find this channel only after navigating through a few detours:

Principles of success

  • Everyone has a scheme for getting rich that will not work.
  • When in doubt, mumble. When in trouble, delegate.
  • Whatever you have done is never a complete failure. It can always serve as a bad example.
  • When the going gets tough, everyone leaves.
  • In case of doubt, make it sound convincing.
  • It’s a simple task to make things complex, but a complex task to make them simple.
  • If you try to please everybody, nobody will like it. 

Unknown Sage

Yes, life has many ups and downs.  And if you believe as I do that both success and failure are indeed unavoidable in our life’s journey, then that begs the question, “What do we do about it?”

Perhaps a few thoughts about ritual and/or alternative action would be worthwhile.  Permit me to offer examples.

When I find myself too wound up or too wound down my favorite, alternative action is to head to the corral.  There is something about being around horses that calms me.  Others may put on their running shoes and head out for a long run.  Going to the range and hitting a few hundred golf balls might be your preferred action.  Maybe praying in church or meditating restores calm and confidence.  Whatever your preference, what’s most important I think is to have a strategy for addressing life’s twists and turns.

My college basketball coach and life mentor offers this example about one of his rituals:

My frustrations or overwhelming joy were taken out scrubbing the kitchen floor.

Harley Knosher

And yes, there were times during our basketball season that Harley’s kitchen floor was spotless!  I won’t say whether that was due to our victories or our defeats.  Such is the nature of competition – in sports; in business; in life; agreed?  But he had this and other alternative actions to help him deal with life’s highway.

What are yours?

GAP

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Bulldozers…

I was speaking with a manager recently; small talk mostly; family; friends; current events.  With the age of his children, he is more tuned into today’s primary and secondary education systems than I am.  (My wife and I have to rely on the Google Machine whenever we help our second grade grandson with his math homework.  How did we ever make it to this century!!!?)

Anyway, the manager was describing today’s trend of parental “participation” in their children’s schools.  It used to be referred to as “helicopter moms” or “helicopter dads”.  You know, hovering over their children and their children’s teachers and their children’s coaches; “helping” their sons and daughters succeed; risk of failure was not an option.

And just when we thought things could not get worse… he tells me today’s trend is “bulldozing parents”; not simply hovering, guiding, influencing.  No – today, many parents actually do the school work for their sons and daughters.  Today, they’re trying to bulldoze the risk of failure out of the equation altogether.

But will it work?  Will today’s grade schoolers and high schoolers become successful adults if their parents are “bulldozers”?  I guess we will find out in the future when they encounter their first hardship solo.  In the 21st century, do you think we can still learn from Attila the Hun?

Huns learn much faster when faced with adversity.

Wess Roberts

In the meantime, when these young ones enter today’s workforce, what will happen to them sans bulldozer parents?  As sales managers, what lessons cross over into the business world from our modern education (and parental) systems?

I was speaking with a sales director friend of mine recently – he likes to check in from time to time; he thinks “the old guy can still hunt”.  We were discussing front line sales management and the “principles of gravitational pull.”

He said he sees many sales managers working extra hard trying to help their under-performing sales reps.  A common phenomenon, true?  When I asked what extra hard work he sees sales managers performing with (or for) their under-performers… his testimony was predictable; “Well, they help their under-performers on sales calls…”  And there it stands – hidden in plain view – the gravitational pull of sales managers “jumping in” to rescue a deal they fear their under-performers would otherwise lose – “Bulldozing”.

The stark reality about under-performers – which research after research continues to confirm is – they aren’t going to make it.  The sales manager’s time is best invested with their top performers.  When the under-performers don’t make it, the sales managers’ “bulldozing” yields a handful of deals and lots of open positions (temporarily occupied or not):

Among the chief worries of today’s business executives is the large number of unemployed still on the payrolls. 

Unknown Sage

Easy for me to blog about – extremely hard to do in the “real world”… but IMHO rather than “bulldozing”, when a sales manager is in the field with an under-performing sales rep, the manager has to allow the rep to fail; even if it means losing the deal.  It’s what happens after the sales rep fails that counts:

It seems to me that the largest impediment to a healthy attitude toward failure is our inability to distinguish between just plain being stupid and failing on the way to great success. 

Unknown Sage

Bulldozers are commonly used to start construction projects.  But they are long gone before that project is successfully completed.  Failing to move the bulldozers out of the way would be plain stupid.

GAP

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2019 – A year of Fulfillment?

Welcome to the New Year!  Will it be our best year yet?  …

When preparing for an excellent year, I always recommend starting at the beginning; in this case writing our 2019 Annual Achievement Plan.  Planning our year is more than simply thinking about a few goals.  Unwritten goals without corresponding milestones are just “hope”, and as the business book title suggests, Hope is not a Strategy©.

Nonetheless, our 2019 Achievement Plan should start with a point of reference:

The first and most important thing about goals is having one. 

Geoffrey Albery

Then, to advance our Plan we should write down our goals.  And when writing our goals, I believe it’s wise to incorporate the “Principle of Balance”:

At work, many of us write business plans thinking only in terms of the Financial Success quadrant, true?  Yes, financial success is important.

I remember while leading top sales teams, I would occasionally hear one of my Producers say that being family-oriented was more important than sales success.  I agree.  However, I believe one of the best ways to care for my family is to be successful in sales or whatever endeavor one pursues.  Money may not buy happiness, but I believe it’s harder to be happy if you’re broke.

The Financial Success and Family quadrants are connected and I believe in establishing personal goals for my family role, too.  Writing down goals for our family is quite personal – but just as important as any other quadrant in our Annual Achievement Plan.  It could be taking a family vacation; committing to time each day with the kids; “unplugging” while at dinner with our spouse; calling Mom and Dad each week.  It’s all of those “little things” that make a big difference to our family.

Go on – take a moment to write down your 2019 goals for the role you will play with your family; we’ll wait.

The importance of the Personal Development quadrant in our plan is another key to success – as the business book title suggests, What Got You Here Won’t Get You There©.  Personal Development is, well, personal.  Yet writing goals in our Personal Development quadrant reinforces the Principle of Balance.

Leading us to the Fulfillment quadrant.  Our favorite, Unknown Sage puts it this way:

Life is measured by the number of moments that take our breath away.

Although I advocate writing an Annual Achievement Plan; with measurable goals; corresponding milestones; striving to make each year my best year yet…  I also believe in the power of imagination; the presence of magic; and the purpose of fulfillment.

The idea came from a former colleague of mine, Peter Goodwin.  He believed in the annual planning process too, but added a unique twist to his that I have since incorporated into mine.  Each year I write down lifetime fantasies that if I could be so blessed, I will achieve.

And when I do realize the fulfillment of one of those fantasies, I don’t check it off the list.  No, it remains on my Annual Achievement Plan with the date of the fulfillment; serving as a milestone, a constant reminder of the power of fantasy; the presence of magic.  And it reinforces the Principle of Balance.

Go ahead – update your list of fantasies in the Fulfillment quadrant of your 2019 Plan.  And please “DREAM BIG!” James Collins in his book, Built to Last©, called them:

Big, Hairy Audacious Goals!

So here’s to 2019– may it be our best year yet!

GAP

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123118…ABC

Code?  No.  123118 is the last day of the year; aka the last day to “hit our number” for anyone not on an alternative fiscal year.  The countdown to midnight; to accelerate our accelerators (maybe, to keep our job).

ABC?

ABC: Always be closing. Telling’s not selling. 

2000 Drama Boiler Room

Please tell us your favorite “sales-closing” story.

Here are two of mine.

I worked with a seasoned sales professional years ago at Integral Systems.  He needed this one last deal to exceed his number and qualify for Club.  His prospect was in New York and he started with the old “camp-out-close” – showing up at their office without an appointment; determined to see his prospect; camped out until he did; needed to close the deal.  The prospect played along.

Unfortunately after agreeing to meet, his prospect wasn’t budging any further as my colleague tried every “ABC” tactic he knew – an extra discount; lenient contract terms; even an opt-out, side letter (unacceptable by today’s revenue recognition standards, but a common “last resort” back then).  At the end of a short but spirited interaction between the sales rep and his prospect, the “because-it’s-my-day” close was born.  It likely went something like this:

Prospect:  “I’m sorry, but as I told you; our plan is to finalize our vendor selection in January.  Why should I buy from you today?”

Sales Rep:  “Well Sir; because today is my day; and you have an opportunity to make today a special day for me.  Some day it will be your day; and when that day arrives, someone will have the opportunity to make that day a special day for you.  But today is my day and that’s why you should buy today.”

And his prospect did!

And then there’s the variation of the “because-it’s-my-day” close, I call the “me-or-my-successor” close:

As a sales professional, I carried a quota for over 40 years.  And I can remember my 2nd quota year as clearly as any.  You see, in my first year, I was more lucky than good.  That led to a promotion, and a hefty quota increase for my second year – I was in over my head.

After 26 weeks into my 2nd year, I was put on a “performance warning”.  At the 39th week, the Vice President of Sales was asking my Sales Manager to fire me.  Since my company had chosen to proactively promote me (perhaps a bit prematurely) at the start of the year, I asked my Sales Manager to give me 52 weeks to sell my annual quota.

We agreed that at the end of the 52nd week, if I was still below 100%, I would resign.  At the end of my 51st week, I was at 75% and significantly behind the required sales dollars necessary to keep my job.  However, I had been working hard on a very large account.

I called the executive at my prospect and asked, “Do you think you will accept our proposal?”  “Yes”, was his response.  “Excellent, thank you!”  I reacted.  And then I added, “Do you think you could place your order this week?”  When my prospect asked why, I said, “Because if you place your order next week, it will be with my successor.”

And at the 52nd weekly sales meeting, with the Vice President of Sales in attendance, I “roll-called” the second largest deal in the Region’s history; finished my 2nd year at exactly 100% of my quota; and kept my job.

123118… “ABC” everyone, “ABC”.  Bon chance!

GAP

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Christ’s birthday…

Merry Christmas to all!

Wishing you a day of peace, hope, joy and celebration with family and friends.

Of course, Christmas is more than just one day, true?  Whatever our spiritual beliefs, may each of us find meaning to our life during this season in a way that lasts throughout the entire year.  So here’s to looking back and celebrating 2018; and to looking forward to an even better 2019!

Lest there be any confusion, may we be reminded of that which was important this year, and that which wasn’t.

We are reminded by bankers to be of good cheer:

A little boy received a new drum for Christmas.  Shortly thereafter, his father came home from work and the mother told him, “I don’t think the man upstairs likes to hear Georgie play his new drum, but he’s certainly subtle about it.  “How do you know”? asked the father.  “Well, this afternoon he gave Georgie a knife and asked him if he knew what was inside the drum.”

Herbert Prochnow

We are reminded by the gospel to be satisfied with who we are not what we bought:

You’re blessed when you’re content with just who you are – no more, no less.  That’s the moment you find yourselves proud owners of everything that can’t be bought.

Matthew 5

We are reminded by the novelists to remember (and be thankful for) our “fortunes”:

Reflect upon your present blessings, of which every man has many; not on your past misfortunes, of which all men have some.

Charles Dickens

We are reminded to offer His blessings to you and yours from me and mine.

GAP

News and no news…

It’s interesting to see people’s reactions when they are waiting for an answer or an update. This happens during common customer service settings.  It also happens with more impactful leadership communication situations.

Take customer service interactions. The customer has a problem; contacts customer service; and expects resolution. “Expects” is the key word. Sometimes the customer service rep has no news.

No news from the service rep begets a wide range of responses from the customer.  On the one hand the customer might calmly accept the, “We’ll get back to you as soon as possible” response.  Then there’s the other hand:

After exhausting every possible way to assist an irate client for the past 45 minutes, and then concluding her phone conversation in the professional manner she had been trained for, the client service representative was heard to let out a pent-up, rhetorical question of frustration, “What does this customer want me to do about their problem, perform magic”? 

Unknown Sage

Similar ranges of reactions occur between a manager and her direct reports.  I have written about leadership communications (and lack thereof) often.  Been there; done that myself.  Jerry Jarvis taught me about the lack thereof:

As Sales Director, I spent at least one day each month observing my sales reps in action; in the field.  All nine of them were tenured and experienced.  Yet, their sales performance was unacceptable.  The owner of the company hired me to turn things around.  We weren’t sure if we had an attitude-problem or a people-problem.  I felt it was the former, but I had recently terminated two of my nine reps.

Today, I’m in Orange County meeting my southern California sales rep for breakfast at the start of my “ride along”.  He seemed nervous; we both knew he was struggling.  Our small talk dissipated quickly, when suddenly he blurted out, “Are you here to fire me?”  Catching me off guard, I paused and replied, “No” slowly and calmly drawing out the O sound.  He took out his cell phone; dialed; and said, “It’s OK honey.  He’s not firing me.”

Much more relaxed now, Jerry tried to change the subject to the itinerary for today’s ride along. I stopped him, saying, “Whoa whoa whoa – what was that all about?” He then proceeded to educate me about leadership communications – or lack thereof: 

  1. He noticed I wasn’t traveling with my PC.  (It was with IT as they were applying several updates.)  Jerry assumed I didn’t have my PC, so I could take his back after firing him.
  2. He was the lowest rep on the sales performance report; I had fired the previous two lowest reps; he figured he was next.
  3. And I had not specifically told him I was not going to fire him; in fact, I had offered him no news at all.  So he filled in the blanks.

Well, I didn’t fire Jerry.  He went on to have a very successful sales year.  He (and his wife) were all worked up over no news – my bad.

In cases where our leaders don’t inform us, we “fill in the blanks” on our own like Jerry did, true?  Our leaders would like us to be patient when they have “no news”.

We on the other hand want “news” – even if it’s simply acknowledging what’s on our mind and providing a frequent and sincere, “I don’t have any news yet, but I wanted to you to know that I’m working on it.”

That is news.

GAP

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How to have a winning day…

Throughout my career, I’ve surrounded myself with smart, successful, professional people.  At the beginning of my career (starting out clueless) I felt the best chance I had for success was to do what they did – sort of “paint-by-numbers”.

I’ve known several great sales professionals… worked alongside many; managed a few; reported to one; learned from them all.  I even created my own, “Sales Hall of Fame”.  Next to the name of each of these Hall of Famers I have written down what makes them great:

Dan Callahan – Execution

Barb Sadtler – Commitment

Gary Given – Persuasiveness

Rob Mikleson – Competitiveness

Lisa Kwiecien – Tenaciousness

Joy Cox – Professionalism

Jim Robertson – Style

Mike D’Onofrio – Preparation

John Kleinhenz – Determination

Steve Allen – Focus

Nick Ryder – Savvy

Rob Denkewalter – Intellect

These great sales people have many things in common.  For instance, they are very smart; keenly skilled; unbelievably smooth; totally articulate; and quite worldly.  Most are a bit quirky, too.  (Thank God I’m normal!)  Some are more personable than others. (Yes, arrogance can creep into successful, self-made sales professionals.)

And I’m still learning – from them and from others – every day.  Sometimes it’s something new; often times it’s a reminder of the basic principles from all of the winners that came before me.  Why not follow the trail already blazed by the best-of-the-best?

One example comes from Gary Givan, a great salesman I used to work with.  It’s the principle of having a good day.  He teaches us:

Focus on having a good day, every day; and the year will take care of itself.

Sage advice, yes?  Over the years I’ve found extensions to this principle – focusing on the “How” when trying to have a winning day:

How to have a Winning Day:

  1. You have to listen more than you talk…
  2. You have to smile more than you frown…
  3. You have to be fascinated more than you’re frustrated…
  1. You have to believe in yourself more than you doubt yourself.
  1. You have to work more than you whine.
  2. You have to do more than you don’t.

Rob Gilbert

Do more than you don’t – I especially like that one!  When you’re having a tough time one great remedy is to just go sell somebody something!  (OK; easier said than done sometimes; but a great remedy nonetheless.)

Work more than you whine – I have recently wandered off this path; testing the patience of my wife and my friends; let life’s circumstances gain the upper hand.  It’s time to retrace my steps and return to the path of a winning day.

The nice thing about focusing one day at a time is that it’s just one day.  Some days we win; some we lose; and some get rained out; but tomorrow is always another day and another opportunity to succeed.  I guess I should add resiliency; mental toughness; and the ability to try and try again to my list of “Hall of Famer” attributes.  William Feather described it this way:

Success seems to be largely a matter of hanging on after others have let go.

And while we’re hanging on; one day at a time; we can concentrate our energy around simply trying to make today a good day.  Oh, and one more tip (from our favorite, unknown, pet loving Sage) regarding the “How”:

Wag more than you bark.

Today – I will learn from my dog – she wags her tail – every day!  How about you?

GAP

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Common enemies…

Posted Dec 5 2018 by in True North with 0 Comments

“OK Pokorn”, you might be thinking… “How will you correlate that title with peace and positivity?”  Well, there is actually great power found in emotional negativity that can be harnessed for the greater good.  And it is this appeal to the greater good that we should remember today and every day.

This Friday is Pearl Harbor Day.  On December 7, 1941, an emotional, negative event occurred that summoned a powerful, driving force for the greater good.  From a factual standpoint according to Google:

In total, 2,335 Americans died and 1,143 were wounded.

Nothing remarkable in the annals of bloody combat, or even the bloody headlines of 2018, true?  But the highly-charged political discourse that followed epitomized by President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “Infamy Speech” (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infamy_Speech ) united our country against a common enemy.

Negative emotions can be a powerful, driving force.  But always a force for the greater good?  With the difficult events that have occurred almost daily throughout 2018, we certainly hope so.

Take today’s constant drum beat around “fake news”.  Fake news is a phrase that has in recent years dominated American politics, true?  According to Wikipedia:

Fake news is a type of yellow journalism or propaganda that consists of deliberate disinformation or hoaxes spread via traditional print and broadcast news media or online social media… The relevance of fake news has increased in post-truth politics.

Post-truth politics?  Let’s follow the Wikipedia link:

Post-truth politics is a political culture in which debate is framed largely by appeals to emotion disconnected from the details of policy, and by the repeated assertion of talking points to which factual rebuttals are ignored. Post-truth differs from traditional contesting and falsifying of facts by relegating facts and expert opinions to be of secondary importance relative to appeal to emotion.

Sounds similar to the highly-charged political discourse that followed the attack on Pearl Harbor.  But in 2018, are we our own common enemies?  I say again, can these negative, powerful, driving emotions become a force for the greater good?  I certainly hope so.

Let’s look at the business world.  We often see evidence of power when a company unites against common enemies.  Steve Jobs continuously crusaded to be taken seriously – until Apple rose to dominate personal, technology devices and the way we all consume entertainment and information today.  The common enemy was their adversity when facing marketplace disrespect.  And that negative, driving force drove Apple to astronomical heights.

“ADVERSITY”:

Adversity has the effect of eliciting talents, which, in prosperous circumstances, would have lain dormant. 

Horace

The American Red Cross inspired from the carnage of our Civil War, formerly launched in 1881 in Washington D.C.  This powerful organization is also untied against common enemies – the devastated; the wounded; the needy; the destitute; the hungry.

Yes, there are many common enemies that coupled with the negative, emotional reactions they stimulate give rise to harnessing power for the greater good:

In every community, there is work to be done.

In every nation, there are wounds to heal.

In every heart, there is the power to do it.

Marianne Williamson

Here’s to Pearly Harbor Day and all the power it generated to propel our country forward in the face of common enemies.  What lessons have we learned?  How will we propel America and our fellow Americans, forward this December in the face of our many common enemies – real and fake?

In every community, there is work to be done.  And in our hearts, we all have the power to do it!

GAP

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Changing ways …

There are lots of things changing in our modern world today.  And our pace of change is amazing.  Modernization; automation; the Internet of Things; today’s changing ways goes by many names.  We assume these changes will be for the better; we’d like to believe in “new and improved”!

With today’s “new ways”, when we experience something that’s still being done the “old way” it stands out.

During a recent business trip, I rented a car and checked into a hotel.  You know, the usual stuff done the usual way.  The car rental experience seemed simple enough; the hotel check-in process?  Well, that struck me as something still being done the “old way”.

Why is it that it takes only a few minutes and no paperwork to pick up or drop off a rental car at Hertz’s #1 Club Gold, but twice that time and an annoying name/address form to check into a Hilton hotel?  Are they afraid you’ll steal the room? 

Michael Tracy

True, business travel affords us plenty of opportunities to poke fun at travel providers.  Poke fun aka the “old way”.  Complain, rant on social media sites, blast people and places on Trip Advisor… it seems like that is the “new way”.

Often these days, the new ways can stimulate increased strain and stress don’t they?  Call me kooky, but isn’t that the opposite impact “new ways” are supposed to contribute to society?   What do you think?

I mean, any kind of travel can be frustrating, yes?  Just commuting to or from the office has taken on new perils in our modern society.  You tell me; is road rage a “new way” or an “old way”?  Even Uber is not insulated from it.  Believe it or not, Wikipedia suggests this is actually the “old way” dating all the way back to 1987:

The term originated in the United States in 1987–1988 from anchors at KTLA, a television station in Los Angeles, California, when a rash of freeway shootings occurred on the Interstate 405, 110, and 10 freeways in Los Angeles.

I get it; it can be hard to embrace changing ways.  Especially for those of us who are comfortable doing things the “old way”.   Yes, yes, that way drives the kids crazy.  They’re amazed we have made our way to this point doing things the “old way”.  That’s OK.  Our way is not for everyone.

And you must admit that some things (travel or otherwise) ought not to be changed:

You’ll notice that the airport buildings are in the distance.  We don’t land at the terminal because it scares the heck out of the people inside. 

Mark Sanborn

But changing ways are inevitable.  And there are lots of smart people coming up with “new ways” everyday intending to make our life better.  They’re trying to avoid the strain and stress when “new ways” supersede “old ways”.  I suppose changing ways will always anger some.

Seth Godin reminds us all that it will be OK:

Do you have to abandon the old ways today?  Of course not.  But responsible stewardship requires that you find and empower heretics and give them the flexibility to build something new instead of trying to force the Internet to act like direct mail with free stamps.

During times of changing ways, we should not try to hold things back.  Even someone like me who often prefers the comfort of the “old way”, needs to step out of the aisle and let the other passengers by.

GAP

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