TheQuoteGuys

The Peace & Power of a Positive Perspective

Connect

Archive for the ‘Cowboy Up – You’ll Get Through It’ Category

To our cowboys …

I wrote a little ditty once about being yourself, costumes, self-improvement, and my dog (see http://thequoteguys.com/2012/11/be-yourself/ ).  In it I said that for Halloween that year I wore an American Cowboy costume to my wife’s Halloween party.  I also confessed that I’m no cowboy.

I’m fascinated by cowboys and the traditions of the American West.  Businesses and business executives in this country could make things better for all of us if more leaders heeded the advice found in one of my favorite books (and a source for more than a few quotes when writing these little ditties):  Cowboy Ethics© by James P. Owen:

I have come to realize that anybody can make money; it is much harder to make a difference.

The book was a gift from a client of mine from several years ago, Steve Major.  Working for Steve made a difference in my life.  And his leadership ethics made a positive impact on the lives of many other people that worked for him, too.

My son Kevin continues to make a difference in my life.  We are celebrating his birthday this week – I thought you might like this present I gave him a few years ago.  This is the opening to chapter seven in my book, The Peace & Power of a Positive Perspective©.  Enjoy!

Chapter VII: Cowboy Up – You’ll Get Through It!

Dedicated to the American Cowboy – may we all learn to be more like them.

Now, I’m no cowboy; but I know one.

Cowboys are quiet, polite – men of few words; comfortable just listening while others around them bark at the moon nonstop.

No, I’m no cowboy; but I’ve heard one.

Cowboys have a reserve of strength far and above the average person – physical strength to be sure; but also great emotional strength.

I’m definitely no cowboy; but I’ve seen one.

Cowboys have the ability to remain in control even while every living thing around them, man and beast, spooks in mortal fear.

True, I’m no cowboy; but I’ve been protected by one.

Cowboys remain focused even with adrenaline rushing through their veins when they’re bull riding, or racing flat out, one-handed on horseback, to rope an escaping calf.

Yes, I’m no cowboy; but I’ve lived with one.

Cowboys are fearless especially at the age of 15 when they look down in the chute and prepare to mount a bare back bucking bronco at their very first high school rodeo competition.

Absolutely, I’m no cowboy; but I’ve filmed one looking down that very chute.

Cowboys always believe they can.  The cowboy feels that sigh of relief when he’s all twisted up in the dirt, having fallen off a stumbling horse and the rodeo announcer comes on the PA system and says, “Well folks, he’ll have an option for a re-ride.”

So, I’m no cowboy, but I’ve sat next to his Mother in the stands when we heard that Rodeo Announcer come over the P.A. System to say, “Well folks, he’ll have an option for a re-ride.” And as the announcer glanced down to the stands to see her reaction he quickly added, “But his Mother says NO!”

You see, I know a lot about cowboys.  That’s why I’m so sure I’m not one.  No, I’m no cowboy, but my son Kevin is.  And every day I try to be a little bit more like him.

Yes, American cowboys are still among us.  And my son Kevin is one of them.  Happy birthday Kevin!  I love you, Dad.

GAP

Did you like this little ditty?  You might enjoy my past posts too: www.TheQuoteGuys.com

Dates never forgotten…

The anniversary of “the” September 11th was remembered this week.  A date we will never forget.  What dates are never forgotten for you?

In the beginning of the novel, A Tale of Two Cities© is the contrast, “It was the best of times; it was the worst of times…” within the context of both occurring at the same time.  For Americans, 9/11/2001 seems like a demarcation point between the best of times before that morning and the worst of times after, true?  That’s when terrorism figuratively and literally collided into freedom.

Do you remember where you were when news of the planes crashing into the World Trade Centers in New York was broadcast?  I always will.  It’s amazing what we can accomplish during the best of times; and what we can endure during the worst of times, don’t you think?  The 9/11 attacks were the worst of times for many Americans.

April 20, 1999 was the worst of times for my home town.  (Although truly, we are all Columbine.)

At a personal level, how many bests have you enjoyed and worsts endured?  The bad times help us appreciate the good times even more, yes?  Here’s what Ernest Hemingway said:

Life breaks us.  And when we heal, we’re stronger on the broken parts.

Our ability to gain strength from adversity should come as no surprise, though.  Our ancestry is made of up generations who had to overcome adversity.  Much of today’s adversity pales in comparison to theirs, doesn’t it?

For many of us who did not suffer a direct loss of loved ones from these tragic events, our hardships now come in the form of inconvenience and economics.  We work harder today to keep up than we did before; travel has become more difficult; guns are all too prevalent in our society; in our schools (and at our concerts!).

Things we once dreamed of seem further from our reach.  We have extended our resources close to the breaking point in defense of our country and our way of life.   But for America, that’s nothing new.  Our country has been on the brink; had parts broken; and healed back stronger for as long as we have been a country.  Were the hardships of the Revolution, the Civil War, the Great Depression, the Viet Nam War, the Civil Rights Movement, or any other national, local, personal, or family crisis less hard?

We are up to facing today’s challenges.  We are strong because we come from generations of strength – families who struggled to make for this country, for their families, and for themselves the best of times.  Like past generations, Americans today have the opportunity to earn and enjoy the better things in life.  And we know why they are the better things:

To really enjoy the better things in life, one must first have experienced the things they are better than. 

Oscar Holmolka

So this week we reflect on that never forgotten, life-changing event now known as 9/11.  Like the day an American walked on the moon, or the night the USA Olympic hockey team won the gold medal to Al Michael’s famous words broadcast around the world, “Do you believe in miracles?”,  let’s turn to our favorite, Unknown Sage once again for this reminder:

The First Rule of Life: The best things in life aren’t things.

My local community is stronger following the 4/20 Columbine killings; and I believe America is stronger following the 9/11 terrorist attacks.  Both dates will never be forgotten.

GAP

Did you like this little ditty?  You might enjoy my past posts too: www.TheQuoteGuys.com

Achievement Drive…

I met with a front-line sales manager recently.  I believe front-line management of any kind is among the most difficult jobs in today’s work place.

He recapped the sales management process he has put in place.  He has confidence in this process; his 1-to-1 coaching interactions; the clarity of expectations he’s set with each of his sales reps.

However, at the team level?  Of his 7-person sales team; 2 are over-quota; 1 is at quota; and 4 are under-quota.  Scary.  I said his distribution was in line with industry research.  Not following the research, he was surprised.

I’m not experienced with other functional areas, but in the sales area teams rarely have everyone over-quota.  I know managers want “A-Players”; but in the real world, most teams have “B” and “C” players, too.

Integrity Solutions (see https://www.integritysolutions.com/) recently provided this research published in Sales & Marketing Magazine©:

Perhaps the most important issue affecting sales performance today is the concern over lagging sales quotas.  According to CSO Insights, only 51% of salespeople across all industries made quota in 2017, down from 53% in 2016, 55.8% in the previous year, and a steady decline from 63% in 2011.

Barely 50% of sales reps are over-quota.  Almost 50% don’t make it!  That catches a sales manager’s attention, yes?  Scary.  Add in the reality that some over-performing reps will turn over every year (either positive, aka “promotion”; or negative, aka “adios”) and the sales manager’s team quota looms even larger.

It’s scary to believe that 50% of your sales people won’t make quota.  It begs the question, “What do I do about it?”  Integrity Solutions offers us coaching; the Germans do too.

Fear makes the wolf bigger than he is. 

German Proverb

I said to my colleague that he should not invest his time equally with his 7 sales reps.  He agreed, thinking he should spend more time with his under-performers.  I suggested exactly the opposite.

You see, his under-performers have to earn extra resources (including their manager’s time).  Industry research states many of them simply won’t make it.  As a sales manager, I believe the best thing we can do for our people is to help them clarify their understanding of themselves.  Sales is the unchosen profession:

Sales is what we do when we can’t do anything else.

But it’s not for everyone; nor is it easy.  It can be scary.

Integrity Solutions extends this foundation-building advice:

Every salesperson unconsciously asks and silently answers these questions as part of that internal dialogue:

  • Who am I?
  • What’s possible for me to sell?
  • What’s not possible for me to sell?
  • What’s possible for me to earn?
  • What’s not possible for me to earn?
  • What level of people am I able to call on and sell?
  • What level of people am I not able to call on and sell?
  • What level of life rewards do I think I deserve to enjoy?
  • What level of life rewards do I not think I deserve to enjoy?

The sales rep’s musts: Answer these questions before the sales manager can offer support.  Pour a foundation of achievement drive to build knowledge and skills upon.  Start with the right mind set:

What would you attempt to do if you knew you could not fail? 

Robert Schuller

The sales manager can help; but research indicates most sales reps won’t commit to, or be able to succeed.  That means the manager’s 100% quota assignment will ultimately come from the achievement drive of 50% of the reps.  Scary.

GAP

Did you like this little ditty?  You might enjoy my past posts too: www.TheQuoteGuys.com

Who’s TOUGHER than you?

Spoken as a verbal tag line by “Lou from Littleton”, former radio sports talk show personality on the airwaves of Denver and beyond (FIFTY THOUSAND WATTS OF POWER – 850 KOA – THE BLOW TORCH!).

Lou’s real name is Tom Manoogian.  He was one of my favorite radio personalities – distinctive verbal style originating from Detroit; catchy clichés; a Broncos homer; soft on his callers (referred to everyone as “cous” as in cousin); tough on company B.S.  How tough?  He left the broadcasting booth at KOA to buy a competing radio station so he could call the shots; do things his way.

Imagine if our remedy for office B.S. was to simply buy the company.  We can all agree that office B.S. is tough. But business; families; friendships; relationships; politics; life in general are tough too.  Just about everything is competitive these days.  That’s OK – we’re tough enough:

I’ve been up against tough competition all my life.  I wouldn’t know how to get along without it. 

Walt Disney

We can all dream; and for a few, dreams come true – if we’re tough enough.

While Lou was on the air, he made his callers feel so comfortable that they often related personal tales about overcoming adversity.  Sports challenges, for sure; but also stories of life’s trials and tribulations we all face sooner or later; less or more.  And if the caller was “J.K.” and J.K. had a story to share about overcoming adversity, at the end Lou would always add, “Who’s tougher than J.K.?” as testimony to J.K.’s triumph.

Lou applied his, “Who’s tougher than…” to sports stories of the day.  Comeback victories; beating the odds; under dogs slaying prohibitive favorites; any and all tales of victory; punctuated by Lou’s, “Who’s tougher than x, y, or z?”  Verbalized with gusto; articulated slowly; every syllable over emphasized. “WHO’S…TOUGH…ER…THAN!”

I thought of Lou from Littleton the other day on my drive home from the airport.  Actually it wasn’t “day”, it was night; actually, it wasn’t “night”, it was one o’clock in the morning.  Up for 19 hours, I wasn’t even home yet.  And of course, I was scheduled for a 9:00 a.m. meeting.  That’s what’s called being a Road Warrior!

I used to be a Road Warrior back in the day.  Thirty years ago, these marathon work days occurred every week.  I never gave it much thought, other than “hang tough”; “just making a living”; “all-in for the big bucks”; “makin’ the donuts”; “who’s TOUGH…ER…THAN”; “Road Warrior”.  Others may have lighter work schedules; but just about everyone has tough times of one kind or another, true?

Tough times don’t last; tough people do. 

Mike Shanahan

You’re right; many of us endure hardships at work and at home without ever taking off on a plane.  Many of us have to be tough just to make it to the end of a day; just to make it home; just to make ends meet.  So how do we get through?  Where does toughness originate?

Well, recognizing life’s struggles for what they are is a good place to start.  Having the right attitude goes a long way to getting us to the end of each day.  Associating with the right associates helps too:

Stick with the optimists.  It’s going to be tough enough even if they’re right. 

James Reston

So, here’s to you and to your tough mindedness.  Here’s to your shear will power to overcome adversity.  Even without calling into the radio, Lou from Littleton would be proud!

GAP

Did you like this little ditty?  You might enjoy my past posts too: www.TheQuoteGuys.com

The trial and error train…

My wife was updating me recently on the remaining 2017 schedule of events her company will be participating in.  Coordinating business schedules is a common routine among married couples these days, true?

She is pursuing new business development strategies this year – including a handful of new trade shows.  We discussed the commitment; the time; the money; the risk.  We speculated on the trial and error probabilities reflecting on 2016; trying to learn from past mistakes; trying to leverage past successes.

Every time any of us tries something “new”, it’s natural to speculate whether or not such newness will be successful.  And as we all know, almost every new thing (aka trial) involves the risk of failure (aka error).  But to succeed, we must be willing to press on – move forward in the face of possible failure.

Virtually any endeavor involves such risk – a job change; marriage; having children; launching a new product line; investing in new trade shows – almost every endeavor requires a willingness to accept the principles of trial and error.  There are occasional exceptions:

Von Helsing’s Theorem 

If at first you don’t succeed, skydiving is not for you.

But those are exceptions (and we’re not all sky divers).  For our more usual, daily adventures we press on; we overcome adversity; we risk failure in the pursuit of success – financial success to be sure; but family success; relationship success; fulfillment of life success.

Even when failing, we must follow White’s views along with those of White’s followers:

White’s Statement  Don’t lose heart… 

Owen’s Comment on White’s Statement  …they might want to cut it out… 

Byrd’s Addition to Owen’s Comment on White’s Statement … and they want to avoid a lengthy search.

So we jump on the trial and error train.  When we ride that train; when we persevere; many times great things are achieved.  Greatness as defined by financial success to be sure; but greatness has many dimensions – great families; great relationships; great levels of life’s fulfillment.

The tracks of the trial and error train lead to many destinations, some of which include expertise:

An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made in a very narrow field. 

Niels Bohn

Is it worth it?  Do we like the destination that train is leading us to?  Some have lost hope certainly; not every station is called success.  It’s sad to see friends or family members fail; heck, it’s sad to see strangers fail.  Failure by accident; self-inflicted failure; failure from natural causes; even failure arising from acts of God as it’s labeled in the insurance field – all are sad.

Feeling sad or emphasizing or helping those that experience errors is one thing.  Pursuit of our success is something else.  We can and should do all, yes?

Fall down seven times.  Stand up eight. 

Japanese Proverb

It’s more than having a positive attitude and maintaining that “I can do it” outlook.  Trial and error is the train we take to success.  It may not be the only train; some are blessed with life’s fortunes almost without effort.  But that outcome is rare and that train is elusive.

So yes, we can rise today and hope buying the winning lottery ticket will result in fame, fortune and happiness.  Or, we can rise today; face the risks of trial and error; accept that these are the tracks toward success – financial success to be sure; but relationship success; family success; fulfillment of life success.

Life – all aboard!

GAP

Did you like this little ditty?  You might enjoy my past posts too: www.TheQuoteGuys.com

Discomfort…

I chatted with a colleague over coffee recently.  We were discussing her experience and the parallels between acting and selling.  As an actor and a sales professional, she coaches sales professionals on presentation and demonstration skills (check her stellar work out www.performancesalesandtraining.com).

During our conversation something Julie said turned this light bulb on:

Sales success (similar to acting success) requires one to become comfortable with our discomfort.

Oh, and now I’m thinking discomfort is not limited to selling or acting, agreed?  I remember when my wife and I brought our first son home from the hospital after he was born.  He was lying in his crib in his bedroom, sleeping.  I turned to my wife and asked, “Now what?”  Parenthood – a lifelong endeavor of becoming comfortable with our discomfort, true?

You know your children are growing up when they stop asking you where they came from and refuse to tell you where they’re going. 

Unknown Sage

The more I thought about our conversation the more examples came to mind about professional discomfort.  I think about athletes calming their nerves in the waning moments of tight competition; the fame and fortune that goes to the few who made the “big play” during those “big moments” in that “big game”.

Then my mind flashes to the first time my granddaughter got behind the wheel of a car to start learning how to drive.  Everyone was seeking comfort with that particular discomfort; her, me; every other driver on the road!  And that discomfort is not limited to young people:

When I die, I want to die like my Grandfather who died peacefully in his sleep.  Not screaming like all the passengers in his car. 

Unknown Sage

My younger son was a rough rider in high school rodeo for a few years.  I can’t imagine how he overcame the discomfort of lowering his body in the bucking chute onto the back of a soon-to-be bucking bronco; settling in; strapping in; seeking comfort knowing what the ensuing discomfort will entail.  Back to our Unknown Sage:

Cowboy secrets to life’s success:

Don’t let your head strap your hand to anything your butt can’t ride.

Never corner anything meaner than you.

I’m thankful Julie agreed to meet for coffee which stimulated this thinking about discomfort.  She clarified another aspect of my job I hadn’t thought of before.  You see, when I lead sales training sessions I like to take my class participants out of their comfort zone.  Truth be told, I do that because I remember to this day when I was the class participant and totally uncomfortable.

My very first sales trainer, Frank Justo in 1979, scared the bejesus out of me!  The role plays he took the class through were brutal.  Today, as I work with my class participants I smile; remember Frank; and think, payback time!

Thankfully, I came across this thought leadership suggesting one aspect of my approach actually has value:

Training Techniques – Giving Assignments

Hint: People retain and accomplish more when dealing with tasks they are not allowed to complete as opposed to those they are allowed to complete.  We are conditioned to complete things.  It creates discomfort when we can’t, but that discomfort also has a memory value. 

Geri McArdle

Julie summarized that reading for parts and rehearsing for demos whether young actors or old sales reps; are uncomfortable.  Immersing oneself into the role is one technique that helps actors and reps alike, become comfortable with our discomfort.

And hers were very comforting words.

GAP

Did you like this little ditty?  You might enjoy my past posts too: www.TheQuoteGuys.com

I don’t wanna…

As I’m writing this little ditty I’m remembering one of those days.  You too?

Having a bad day in and of itself is nothing rare.  It’s just – I’d rather hear about your bad day and try to console you vs. experiencing that bad day myself.    You too?

It doesn’t matter when I know the cause of my mood.  Today for instance, it began with a family crisis false alarm.  I can’t help it.  Even though my sons are grown men; strong men; men I’m proud of more than I tell them; when one (or both) of them are in danger (real or perceived), I react.  And truth be told in many cases; over-react.  And that’s how my day started.

Once I understood that there was no danger, my mind seemed to switch into this “I don’t wanna” mood.  I tried to carry on; stiff upper lip, and all that.  I tried to have the courage to move forward in spite of the fear for my son (real or perceived).  I turned to our favorite, Unknown Sage; sought courage:

“COURAGE”:  The ability to move in the right direction in spite of fear.

Oh, I continued my day; went to the office; completed my meetings; conducted business as usual.  I mean, it’s not my company’s fault that I’m having a bad day.  Not like what happens at other companies:

Due to recent cutbacks the light at the end of the tunnel will be turned off until further notice. 

Unknown Sage

And I appreciate knowing that I’m in a job, working for an excellent manager, a member of a terrific team, serving clients who value my contributions, all within a leading company in our industry.  Yes, a rare combination of positive factors many business people do not enjoy (and a source of me consoling them).  Nevertheless, today – I don’t wanna!

Who knows – maybe I have been too fortunate?  Maybe it’s just my turn for a bad turn.  Back to you know who:

Law of Life’s Highway:

If everything is coming your way, you’re in the wrong lane.

Unknown Sage

I tried to address my poop-in-the-face attitude.  I read a few articles from TalentSmart one of my favorite thought leaders about emotional intelligence.  I perused their “Unmistakable Habits of Irresistible People” and felt bad.  Tried “Surprising Things Ultra Productive People Do Every Day” and felt worse.  Started down their “Body Language Blunders That Make You Look Bad” and gave up!

Maybe, hopefully, my timing is simply a little off today:

“Timing”:

I just heard the sad story of the comic who lost his timing.  He stepped on his own lines, tried to talk over the laughs, and lost his ability to build a strong close.  He got fired from one gig after another until he got so depressed, he decided to end it all.  He went down to the railroad tracks and threw himself behind a train.

The Jokesmith

I know I’m wearing out my welcome with our Unknown Sage  – but maybe I can still find peace:

My therapist told me a way to achieve peace was to finish things I started.  Today, I finished 2 bags of potato chips, a lemon pie, a fifth of Jack Daniels, and a small box of chocolate candy.  I feel better already! 

Unknown Sage

Yes, maybe that’s it – chocolate, booze, and junk food.  Doctor Oz – don’t start with me.

Well, not to worry.  After writing about it I think I going to be alright after all.  You too?

GAP

Did you like this little ditty?  You might enjoy my past posts too: www.TheQuoteGuys.com

Fear…

I was listening to Townsend Wardlaw’s presentation last month (see TownsendWardlaw.com ).  I’ve known Townsend for several years – IMHO, he is one of the great thinkers in the sales profession.  Last month’s presentation however was less about the tools, tactics and techniques of sales but rather about fear:

Fear makes the wolf bigger than he is. 

German Proverb

We were chatting before he started his prepared remarks; commenting about the audience for this event (see http://www.meetup.com/Denver-Enterprise-Sales/ ); comparing notes about the preponderance of millennials in the sales work force of today.  I told Townsend how much I enjoy working with millennials – how I find them energetic, articulate, coachable and “fearless”.

Townsend offered his usual insight.  “They are unafraid, Gary… but they are not fearless.”  His perspective was based on the generational phenomena that when growing up, parents of millennials did not allow their children to fail.  It caused me pause – I think Townsend might be on to something.

During his presentation, he offered anecdotal insight to a personal experience when he was responsible for building a sales team from scratch.  He was in total control – staffing; methodology; coaching; results.  Aha yes…that age old “results” thing.  Townsend acknowledged that great sales process, tools, tactics and techniques have one ultimate limitation:

Beliefs trump everything.

And if sales reps (or anyone, I suppose) are fearful, then we can’t accomplish all that we are capable of accomplishing; we literally hold ourselves back:

Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate.  Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure.  It is our light, not our darkness, that frightens most of us.  We ask ourselves, “Who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented, and fabulous?” 

Nelson Mandela

I took Townsend’s comments and started to develop a list of sales rep fears – what would you add to, or subtract from, it?

Do I belong in this role?

Do I believe it what I’m selling?

Are my competitors better than me?

Can I justify my price?

In the real world let’s face it; many prospects don’t care about what we care about.  They sabotage our (artificial) deadlines; refuse to be “held accountable”; don’t care if they mislead us; beat a continuous discount drum; true?

Townsend did go on to suggest ideas for living with our fears.  He began by acknowledging we can’t “overcome”; “ignore”; or “eliminate” fear – we live with fear – get over it.  He suggested investing in our physical strength; working on our focus; analyzing what the worst that might happen and realizing most times we are dreaming up our own dread; concluding:

Fear can’t live in the light.

He suggested we simply maintain our courage.  Ahh…courage.  Lot’s has been said and written about courage.  Andrew Jackson, military leader and the seventh President of the United States offered this:

One man with courage makes a majority.

That guidance resonates with me.  Over the years as a sales professional I have always maintained the attitude that I am not my number.  Good or bad, I’ve maintained a willingness to face daily competition; it’s just a deal; it’s not my arm or leg that is at stake.

Following the teachings of other, world-class competitors (even a Roman philosopher) I have tried to face each day with the attitude that, today – I am indestructible!

Our fears are always more numerous than our dangers. 

Seneca

And on more than a few days, it has been only been by my attitude that I was able to get through the day.  You?

GAP

Did you like this little ditty?  You might enjoy my past posts too: www.TheQuoteGuys.com

Just for fun…

Thought I’d lighten things up a bit today after writing a few heavy posts recently.  I mean, I know life can be tough; but it also can get better:

Life breaks us.  And when we heal, we’re stronger on the broken parts. 

Ernest Hemingway

My wife and I went on a weekend getaway with our best friends Steve and Jacquie.  Beer; bear country; and besties – we headed out to mend a few of those broken parts.  We didn’t see any bears but the trip reminded me of my favorite sighting:

A bear who, displaying a $5 bill, had entered a bar and ordered a beer and; the owner of the bar directed the bartender to give the bear the beer, saying that since the bear didn’t look very smart to only give it 25 cents in change.

Having done as he had been instructed, and having watched incredulously as the bear placidly sipped the beer, the bartender finally could no longer contain himself and sought to engage the bear in conversation.  “You know”, he said to the bear, “we don’t get many bears in this bar.”  To which the bear is said to have replied, “at $4.75 a beer, it’s no wonder.” 

Norman R. Augustine

Ah that Norman R. Augustine, former head of Martin Marietta Corporation a huge US Government aerospace contractor.  Talk about broken parts!  Norman shared his sense of humor in his book, Augustine’s Laws ©.  Here’s an excerpt courtesy of Wikipedia:

Law Number III: There are no lazy veteran lion hunters.

Law Number XIII: There are many highly successful businesses in the United States. There are also many highly paid executives. The policy is not to intermingle the two.

Law Number XIX: Although most products will soon be too costly to purchase, there will be a thriving market in the sale of books on how to fix them.

Law Number XXXI: The optimum committee has no members.

Law Number XXXVI: The thickness of the proposal required to win a multi-million dollar contract is about one millimeter per million dollars. If all the proposals conforming to this standard were piled on top of each other at the bottom of the Grand Canyon it would probably be a good idea.

Law Number LII: People working in the private sector should try to save money. There remains the possibility that it may someday be valuable again.

I know it’s not fair to poke fun at our government during an election year.  In the 1930’s America’s leading political wit, Will Rogers, couldn’t help himself:

The trouble with practical jokes is that very often they get elected.

If America’s political process doesn’t drive us all nuts, the cost of living certainly can:

It seems that there was a pretzel stand in front of an office building in New York City.  One day a man came out of the building, plunked down a quarter, and then went on his way without taking a pretzel.  This happened every day for three weeks.  Finally, the old lady running the stand spoke up, “Sir, excuse me.  May I have a word with you?”  The fellow answered,I know what you’re going to say.  You’re going to ask me why I give you a quarter every day and don’t take a pretzel.” The woman replied, “Not at all.  I just wanted to tell you that the price is now 35 cents.”

William Schreyer

Grab your besties everyone – let’s head to bear country for a few beers.  I’m buying!

GAP

Did you like this little ditty?  You might enjoy my past posts too: www.TheQuoteGuys.com

CIO…

May I ask you to change the way you always have been doing it, please?  Yeah – right!

“Change”, now there’s a provocative word in our vocabulary.  And just when we get comfortable with how things are working.  Hey everyone, Windows 11 is on the way – great!

The art of progress is to preserve order amid change and to preserve change amid order. 

Alfred North Whitehead

In the sales profession, what we sell the most of is change, true?  Or we try to – sometimes we face difficult obstacles from our prospective clients as posted on LinkedIn recently:

CIO

We’ve all worked with members of this org chart before, yes?  Truth be told, I have served in one or more of those capacities myself when I have been on the “change” side of the equation.

In business, change is constant.  Here’s a little ditty one of my readers shared with me a while back based on another LinkedIn post:

Just Monkeying Around 

…While eating lunch together with colleagues one of his friends was attempting to peel a banana.  As often happens the stem was not cooperating and a struggle with the banana ensued.  Another friend observing the struggle said “you know you are doing that wrong”.  Everyone at the table turned to hear the revelation on proper banana peeling technique. 

The observer explained that if you watch monkeys, who clearly have been dealing with bananas much longer than we humans, they peel bananas by pinching the opposite end and gently pulling the peel away from both sides of the banana.  

What followed at the lunch table was a mass return to the lunch counter for bananas and a series of very successful tests of the monkey banana peeling technique.  The author observed how often we use the phrase “This is how we’ve always done it” and how inhibiting that is to even looking for new techniques.  Secondly he observed how incredibly valuable firsthand experience or “seeing is believing” is when it comes to learning and embracing change. 

As I read the post and spent time pondering the appeal of his story I started thinking of innovation and change working together.  Not all change is innovative but all innovation implies change.  Like the banana story if we are so comfortable or set in our ways even when they are only marginally effective we miss the opportunity to monkey around with more effective techniques.  Innovative ideas for more effective and efficient ways to work are all around us.

Of course, dealing with change in the business world is one thing; dealing with change in our lives is something altogether different:

God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change; courage to change the things I can; and wisdom to know the difference. 

Unknown Sage

What’s good for me isn’t always good for you, and visa versa – don’t you agree?  The phrase, “not in my back yard” is very Americana, isn’t it?  Yet change is inevitable and more than that, often needed.

Never believe that a few caring people can’t change the world.  For, indeed, that’s all whoever have. 

Margaret Mead

So come-on fellow members of the Chief Indecision Officer’s org chart – let’s get over the worries and get into the fun of making positive change in our lives and those of others.

I wake up every morning determined both to change the world and have one hell of a good time.  Sometimes this makes planning the day a little difficult. 

E.B. White

That’s my call-to-action.  What’s yours?

GAP

Would you like to receive an occasional email of my little ditties? http://thequoteguys.com/contact/