TheQuoteGuys

The Peace & Power of a Positive Perspective

Connect

Posts Tagged ‘Cost of Living’

Keeping my day job…

I’ve been attending the Startups 2.0 MeetUp facilitated by Kenton Johnson (http://www.meetup.com/Startups-2-0-Rocket-Your-Ready-to-Launch-Startup/ ).  Kenton’s experience is outstanding and his content is stellar.   I’ve always been fascinated by the business of business.

At Kenton’s first MeetUp, he established context for the working sessions by citing “Mark Cuban’s 12 Rules for Start-Ups”:

Rule 01:  Don’t start a company unless it is an obsession and something you love.

Rule 02:  If you have an exit strategy, it’s not an obsession.

Rule 03:  Hire people you think will love working there.

Rule 04:  Sales cure all.

Rule 05:  Know your core competencies and focus on being great at them.

Rule 06:  Lunch is a chance to get out of the office and talk.

Rule 07:  No offices.  There is nothing private in a start-up.

Rule 08:  As far as technology, go with what you know. 

Rule 09:  Keep the organization flat. 

Rule 10:  Never buy swag.

Rule 11:  Never hire a PR firm.

Rule 12:  Make the job fun for employees.

I met Kenton at Denver’s 2015 StartUp Week.  That’s where I also heard Brad Feld speak for the first time (see http://foundrygroup.com/team/brad-feld/ ).  After Brad’s presentation those in attendance received a copy of his book, Startup Opportunities: Know When to Quit Your Day Job©.  The section, “Trust Me, Your Idea is Worthless” caught my attention.

How many people do we know who want to start their own company because (A) they have a “great idea” and (B) they want to sell their company to get rich?  In other words, they start a company with an exit strategy firmly in place – breaking Cuban’s Rule # 02.

IMHO, in the real world it doesn’t typically work that way.  I mean, if you’ve read the book by Paul Allen, Idea Man© and read about how Paul Allen and Bill Gates launched Microsoft, I bet you were as amazed as I was about their true genius.  Bill Gates didn’t become the richest man in the world by simply duping IBM with a software licensing deal.

Bill Gates became the richest man in the world by creating/coding the Disk Operating System (aka DOS) which ran PC’s – IBM’s and everyone else’s (except of course Steve Jobs at Apple, which is a story for another time).  Sounds straight forward?  Well think about how Paul Allen and Bill Gates had to figure out how to do this by writing the operating system for a machine that wouldn’t work without first having an operating system.  A classic “chicken or egg” conundrum.  Oh and by the way, Gates and Allen definitely understood Mark Cuban’s Rules # 01 and # 02, true?

Reveal Alert:  If you don’t want to read the book about the birthing of the PC era, here is the essence of their work:  (1) Paul Allen wrote a PC hardware emulator to make a DEC mini-computer act as if it were a PC, and (2) Bill Gates coded DOS to run and be debugged on that emulator.  Oh and by the way, Gates wrote his DOS code with pencil and paper; during marathon, 3 day coding sessions; in which he would collapse from exhaustion; only to resume after needed sleep and nourishment.

It seems to me that they ignored Cuban’s Rules # 06 and #12; but definitely maximized Rule #04.

What do you say – Is that the type of commitment coupled with genius seen by those today that have a “great idea”?  Maybe best to keep our day jobs – just saying.

GAP

Did you like this little ditty?  You might enjoy my past posts too: www.TheQuoteGuys.com

Critical Thinking…

Diving into the deep end today – way over my head!  Commenting (critically) about Professors from my college.  What do I know?  Growing up, my parents taught me to always respect my teachers.  It’s good to venture out from our parents’ basements occasionally, true?

Last fall, I attended a panel interview at my Alma Mater titled, “The Value of a Liberal Arts Education in Today’s Global Market Place”.  I was looking forward to the debate – especially one posed by an Interviewer interviewing Educators about today’s “real world”.  Turns out the Interviewer was one of them.  Not much of a debate.

College Professors are stellar at persuasive presentations when they’re on campus, aren’t they?  There we were; on campus; Professors gathered conducting a debate-less, debate with fellow Professors about the “value” of a Liberal Arts degree; in a room full of alumni, all of whom having earned Liberal Arts degrees.  Not exactly the real world setting for critical thinking on the “value in the global market place” I was expecting.

Question:  Can critical thinking thrive in absence of diversity, disagreement, and dissent (aka a debate)?  Well, what do I know?  (Ut Oh – I think I hear my Mom, “Gary, listen to your teachers now.”)  Let’s refer to today’s storage locker of critical thinking, aka Wikipedia:

The National Council for Excellence in Critical Thinking defines critical thinking as the intellectually disciplined process of actively and skillfully conceptualizing, applying, analyzing, synthesizing, and/or evaluating information gathered from, or generated by, observation, experience, reflection, reasoning, or communication, as a guide to belief and action.

Now we’re getting somewhere – especially the last two words, “… and action.”  Count me in on the “and action part.

Our panel of Professors placed particular prominence on learning how to think critically.  OK – we can all agree that thinking in the business world is… well… critical.  However, I’m thinking that many companies place more value on the results of the thinking (aka the action part) when competing in today’s global market place.

I wonder whether things get over-thought on college campuses today.  I confuse easily about undergrads and their exotic, double-majors.    When faced with assigned tasks in today’s global economy, will they take action?  Or, think about taking action – critically, of course?  Did their parents prepare them for today’s boss that says, “You or your successor will get this job done!”?

The Professors’ positioned economic value in the context only academia seems comfortable with – that piece of global economy fiction known as “the long run”.  “In the long run” they stated, a person with a Liberal Arts degree out-earns their peer group.   What about today’s over-emphasis on quarterly-results and the “What have you done for me lately” mentality?

I wonder if many of our Liberal Arts students “qualify” for tens of thousands (if not hundreds of thousands) of dollars of student loan debt to pursue a path of critical thinking to set themselves up for the long run.  But will they qualify for a car loan upon graduation in today’s “real world”?  Not to mention paying rent – which, of course may be why so many of our adult children are living at home with their parents?

“Critical Thinking” or “And Action”; “Results Today” or “In The Long Run”; what carries more value in today’s global market place?  What do I know?

And if you find adult children living in your basement, not thinking critically about paying back their huge student loan debt, are they’re simply waiting for the “long run” to come along?

GAP

Did you like this little ditty?  You might enjoy my website too: www.TheQuoteGuys.com

Oh well…

Hey everyone – its income tax week!  Hooray!

Actually, it’s a day past the deadline – but who’s counting?  Do you think our elected officials are standing on the sideline cheering as our tax returns flow in?  Oh well.

Does it ever seem to you that no matter how you complete your income tax return; no matter how much outside, expert advice you leverage; no matter what plans you put in place to lessen your tax impact next year, you still seem to be funding everything?

On the one hand, I dislike the immense level of government spending that takes place today at the federal, state, county, city and even master association level.  The media reminds us of the tremendous waste that seems to occur every day; every where.  And today, with our anytime, anywhere, all-the-time, political action committees – they all have a position on the state of our state, federal, and local taxation, true?  Could it be some of our taxes fund these messages?  Oh well.

On the other hand, when there is a natural disaster; when we hear of a scientific breakthrough funded by a government grant; or when we simply have a friend or family member in need who receives financial or medical support from a social services program… well, I for one am happy I live in America.

This time is one time during the year when we add it all up.  Sometimes we like the resulting sum; other times we don’t.  And talk about “new math”!

The Income Tax has made more liars out of the American people than golf has.

Will Rogers

Question:  If I work from home and my dog barks when the FedEx driver arrives; does she qualify as my receptionist – and can I write-off the cost of her dog food?  No?  Oh well.

All in all, when I add it up – I am blessed.  How about you?  I suppose it all depends.  Filing income taxes forces us to look at our W-2; our 401k; our IRA; our mortgage interest; our real estate taxes; and all of the other numbers the IRS wants us to look at; and report on.  That’s one way we measure; some years good – some, not so much.

When we look in the mirror, often our not-so-much years are self-inflicted:

More and more these days I find myself pondering on how to reconcile my net income with my gross habits.

John Kirk Nelson

When we heard growing up that, “Money isn’t everything”, do we maintain that perspective as adults?  Hopefully so.  Our top line income, even when reduced by taxes, still can be more than enough for a man that is easily contented.  Unfortunately, the itch of discontent sometimes influences us to spend more than our means.

It’s not what we make that counts; it’s what we save.  Years ago this was called “net worth”.  Today, “line of credit” seems to have replaced the importance of net worth.  Similar to our federal government, line of credit means “debt”; and debt is not the same as net worth.  Oh well.

We are looking forward to 2014 – this will be our best year ever!  And we can stay in control of how we define “best” by following the guidance of the world renowned author and poet, Robert Lewis Stevenson:

Don’t judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds you plant.

And no – the seeds are not tax deductible.  Oh well.

GAP

Did you like this little ditty?  You might enjoy my website too:  The Peace & Power of a Positive Perspective© Please check it out.

Income taxes, oh well…

Hey everyone – its income tax time!  Hooray! 

Actually, our 2011 Income Tax return filing deadline is April 17th this year instead of the traditional April 15th.  Is that because of ObamaNomics?  Oh well.  

Does it ever seem to you that no matter how you complete your income tax return; no matter how much outside, expert advice you leverage; no matter what plans you put in place to lessen your tax impact next year, you still seem to be funding everything?  Are our elected officials standing on the sideline cheering as our tax returns are coming in?  Oh well. 

On the one hand, I greatly dislike the immense level of government spending that takes place today at the federal, state, county, city and even master association level.  The media reminds us of the tremendous waste that seems to occur every day; every where.  And during this election year?  Indescribable.  Oh well. 

On the other hand, when there is a natural disaster; when we hear of a scientific breakthrough funded by a government grant; or when we simply have a friend of family member in need and they receive financial or medical support from a social services program, we are happy we live in America, true? 

Income tax time is one point during the year when we get to add it all up.  Sometimes we like the resulting sum; other times we don’t.  And talk about “new math”! 

The Income Tax has made more liars out of the American people than golf has.

                             Will Rogers 

Question:  If I work from a home office; and my dog barks when the FedEx driver arrives; does she qualify as my receptionist – and can I write-off the cost of her dog food?  No?  Oh well. 

All in all, 2011 was a very good year for us. How about you?  I suppose it depends on how we measure “good”.  Filing income taxes forces us to look at our W-2; our 401k; our IRA; along with our mortgage interest; real estate taxes; and all of those other numbers the IRS wants us to know (and report).  That’s one way to measure “good” (or some years, not so good).  

When we look in the mirror, often much of our financial (and related income tax) pains are self-inflicted: 

More and more these days I find myself pondering on how to reconcile my net income with my gross habits.                                 

John Kirk Nelson

When we heard growing up that money isn’t everything, do we have the same perspective about it as adults?  Hopefully so.  Our top line income, even when reduced by taxes, still can be more than enough for a man that is easily contented.  Unfortunately, the itch of discontent sometimes influences us to spend more than our means.  

It’s not what we make that counts; it’s what we save.  Years ago this was called “net worth”.  Today, “line of credit” seems to have replaced the concept of having net worth.  And like our federal government, line of credit means “debt”; and debt is not the same as net worth.  Oh well. 

We are looking forward to 2012 – this will be our best year ever!  And we can stay in control of how we define “best” by following the guidance of the world renowned author and poet, Robert Lewis Stevenson: 

Don’t judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds you plant.                                 

And no – the seeds are not tax deductible.  Oh well. 

GAP 

Did you like this little ditty?  You might enjoy my book, too:  The Peace & Power of a Positive Perspective©  Please check it out Subscribe.

Defending Price or Selling Value…

What do IKEA; free breakfast; and the memory of my Dad have in common with selling value?  (Really Gary?  Slow day?)  No, really. 

I visit the IKEA cafeteria some Monday mornings.  Since they opened in 2011 they’ve offered a Monday morning breakfast special – free breakfast.  Free – my Dad would be proud. 

It’s a simple affair; scrambled eggs; potatoes; two strips of bacon; and coffee.  And the setting (if you’ve never been in an IKEA store) is a large cafeteria, in a “very-big-box” retail store (400,000+ square feet big).  The parking lot at my office borders the IKEA store, so it’s a short walk for a free breakfast.  Free. 

Let’s pretend you are the sales rep and I am your prospect.  If you were selling me the value of this IKEA breakfast, what would you focus on?  Go on – take a moment and write it down.  We’ll come back to it. 

My fellow sales professionals have worked with me recently on ways to articulate value during their sales process.  In my opinion, selling value (vs. addressing price) is a huge challenge for us.  There are many reasons for this, but generally, I believe value tends to be vague; usually varies by person; and can be very hard to quantify.  

Our prospects often gravitate towards price, don’t they?  And we can inadvertently help this migration by offering things like TCO or ROI calculators.  Guess what the calculators drawn the prospect’s attention to?  Hint – it’s not the “Return” (that’s the number we came up with); it’s the “Cost” in the TCO or the “Investment” in the Return on Investment.  Unlike value, cost is specific; measurable; objective; and doesn’t vary by person. 

My Dad was a “Depression-Era Baby”.  That meant was he was very cost-conscious.  No matter how hard a salesman tried to sell him value, ultimately the price was the determining factor.  I suppose growing up in the Depression had that effect.  When you own little and make even less, everything seems unaffordable. 

In spite of our recent recession, I think we still live in an era of affluence.  However, we don’t like to pay high prices – that’s why prospects often pit sales people against one another to compete for their business.  Do you compete on price?  Your prospect hopes so: 

The Law of the Marketplace: 

If only one price can be obtained for any quotation, the price will be unreasonable.

                                  Unknown Sage 

And who doesn’t enjoy getting a deal? 

         It’s not the cheaper things

That we want to possess

But expensive things

That cost a little less.

                                  Rolf B. White 

An accurate depiction of my Dad’s perspective.  He preferred the higher quality; he listened to the sales presentation featuring value; he just wanted it to cost a little less.  And if he had to make a choice, price often won out over value.  (Although occasionally, he was able to obtain both – and that made for a very good day.) 

Like a free IKEA breakfast on Monday’s – it definitely fits the definition of “a little less”.  My value?  Hint – it’s not the price.  It’s getting out of the office for a few minutes of quiet time to work on a project.  It’s the pleasant, outdoor walk in Colorado sunshine. And it’s the fond memories of my Dad.  I’m visualizing his proud smile as if he joined me for the free breakfast. 

Curious – are those the value statements you wrote down? 

GAP 

Did you like this little ditty?  You might enjoy my book, too:  The Peace & Power of a Positive Perspective©  Please check it out Subscribe.

College football and business value?

I look for value in college football.   The Air Force Academy is one of three NCAA Division I-A programs in Colorado – the others being University of Colorado (CU) and Colorado State University (CSU).  Although Air Force is not well covered (nor seemingly even respected) by the Denver sports media, they are my favorite.  

Of course, value extends way beyond football; it is a key element in our businesses, yes?  So when someone spends money to attend a college football game, or buy a product from our company, they value value. 

Can your business relate to these 10 values I received at a recent game where Air Force played Tennessee State (a Division I-AA opponent)? 

10.  Value can vary by party

The Air Force academy provides Cadets more value than just an undergraduate degree and a chance to play football.   The value for the Tennessee State program?  Well after getting stomped 63-24; their value received was likely the $270,000 revenue share for traveling to Colorado Springs.

  9.  Clients can value fair play:

At Air Force, you never hear of recruiting violations such as the frequent headlines about USC, Ohio State, Miami, and other Division I-A schools who feel they need to cheat to win.  

  8.  Clients can value the superficial:

The beauty of a cloudless, Colorado sky, next to the Rocky Mountain foothills, on a sunny, September day – ‘nuff said!

  7.  Clients can value appearance and rituals:

Just watching the Air Force pre-game, pomp and circumstance; the Cadets marching on to the field; paratroopers dropping into the stadium; and the traditional fly over are worth the price of admission.

  6.  Clients can value more than dollars and cents:

Based on the number of youth football teams attending as guests, Air Force obviously caters to the interests of their local community vs. merely focusing on maximizing ticket sales.

  5.  Clients can value teamwork:

With height and weight recruiting restrictions (not to mention the post-graduate service commitment), Air Force can’t simply field superior athletes like an Alabama, Oklahoma, or LSU can.  Nope, the Cadets must leverage better teamwork to compete.

  4.  Clients can value all of the little things:

Because of their physical limitations, when teamwork alone isn’t enough, Air Force has to play smarter; be better prepared; stay a step ahead of their competition to win.

  3.  A Client’s value can be personal:

Air Force is typically underdogs to the top programs; something I can relate to in my own collegiate basketball playing days.  Making the most from the least to succeed is what I call that – and I really like it when I see it!

  2.  Clients usually include price in their value equation:

After parking for free, I walked up to the ticket window 90 minutes before kick-off and bought a seat on the 25 yard line, 6 rows from the field!  The price?  $20.  The ticket price for the recent CU-CSU game at Mile High Field in Denver?  $55 for the nose-bleed section; plus $30 for parking.

  1.  Almost everyone values a winner:

In the past 10 seasons, Air Force football is 68-55 along with being 2-2 in post season bowl games.  CU?  They are 60-65, going 2-3 in bowl games; CSU? They are 54-69 and 2-3 in bowl games.  

A $20 ticket; free parking; a 63-24 win; on a beautiful September day; with an entertaining, family-friendly environment; by the best team in the state – I call that value! 

GAP 

Did you like this little ditty?  You might enjoy my book, too:  The Peace & Power of a Positive Perspective©  Please check it out Subscribe.

4%? Sounds good …

Compensation – now there’s a topic to test our sense of humor today.  Seems like my “income” isn’t keeping up with my “out-go”.  How about you?  According to the naysayers, if we were the federal government, this wouldn’t matter.  However, we’re not; so it does; yes?  (But I digress…) 

I really shouldn’t complain about money; financially, I have been truly blessed.  Especially when compared to the very first job I had after graduating college (last century, nonetheless!).  When I think of how my wife and I started out back then, well they should be printing a happy face on my pay check stub today.  I can even chuckle when those naysayers start to complain, citing our favorite, Unknown Sage again: 

When I first started working I used to dream of the day when I might be earning the salary I’m starving on now. 

“Starving” might be a bit over-stated; but we would all welcome a little more “take” in our “take-home”; a bit more “net” in our net; I mean, a little more on the “bottom line” is our bottom line, true?  It can be hard to make ends meet today.  Careful about those “ends”, though: 

About the time we can make ends meet, somebody moves the ends.

                                  Herbert Hoover 

(Was Hoover a naysayer?)  

Thankfully, in the sales profession we enjoy a variable component to our compensation.  Call it commissions, bonuses, spiffs, whatever, the great part about being a sales professional is one’s ability to give oneself a pay raise.  

Now figuring out how to calculate those commissions – well that’s a different story.  Let’s just say it would be nice if our employers were a little less creative in designing our compensation plans, yes?  I was looking at my month-end, incentive compensation statement last week.  Talk about “new math”!  I’m always amazed at how some managers can dream up the most imaginative goals for their people.  Then they turn it over to accounting to try and figure out how to make the calculations.  Thank God for super computers! (Or would an abacus be better?) 

How our executives come up with the basis of our incentive can be a bit of a circus, too.  I worked for a painting company once and the owner literally counted the number of railroad cars while waiting for a freight train to decide the number of jobs I had to complete to earn my bonus.   It was a long train, too. 

As you know, the challenge of paycheck accuracy isn’t limited to sales people, either.  Just ask Paul Dickson: 

An angry worker goes into her company’s payroll office to complain that her paycheck is $50 short.  The payroll supervisor checks the books and says, “I see here that last week you were overpaid by $50.  I can’t recall your complaining about that.”  “Well, I’m willing to overlook an occasional error, but this is two in a row.”                                 

There is good new on the horizon, though.  According to a recent business report, employers are planning to offer their employees an average of a 4% pay raise in 2012.  A raise, any raise, would be great!  

Yet, those naysayers will cite our Unknown Sage again, I’m sure: 

The Salary Axiom:

The pay raise is just large enough to increase your taxes and just small enough to have no effect on your take-home pay.                   

 Nonetheless, I’ll take the 4% if offered in 2012, and be grateful for it.  You? 

GAP 

Did you like this little ditty?  You might enjoy my book, too:  The Peace & Power of a Positive Perspective©  Please check it out Subscribe.

Springing into life…

Last weekend I “barreled into spring” – in Palisade, Colorado at the 2011 Barrel Tasting event.  It was a group travel trip that my wife specializes in creating.  Eight wineries, all members of the Grand Valley Winery Association were our hosts.  What a blast!  Check it out – Wine Barrel Tasting – and please plan on joining us next year.

One aspect of this weekend I enjoyed the most was the opportunity to chat with the winery owners in person; listen to their approach to wine making; learn a bit about their background.  Of course, the gourmet food paired with selected wines was very excellent, too.  Add in Western Slope, Colorado weather; the sights of the Grand Mesa and Book Cliffs mountains; and life is pretty darn good!

Business owners and entrepreneurs – they are the backbone of America’s economy, don’t you think?  Maybe the foundation of our entire society, too.  To me, business owners, especially owners of small and mid-sized businesses, represent the ultimate in commitment.  They go “all in” when they start their business.  Some succeed, a few excel, many fail – but most maintain a grounded sense of self along with a stellar sense of humor.

Like Jeff and Carol Carr, owners of Garfield Estates Vineyard & Winery (Garfield Estates). When I was chatting about his background (a former sales executive in the technology industry, which I can relate to), Jeff shared this adage from and Unknown Sage:

How do you make $100k in the winery business?  Start with $1 million.

I suppose that adage can be applied to many business pursuits, true?  But Jeff said it with the kind of smile that implied he traded-in his go-go, high-stress, hi-tech profession for the manual, outdoor labor of running a vineyard on purpose and not by accident.

The same might be true for Bob and Billie Witham of Two Rivers Winery & Chateau in Grand Junction, Colorado (Two Rivers).  Moved up from Texas and moved out of the nursing home business to open a winery, I’m told; added a most elegant chateau and destination event component to their operation.  Bob’s face had a continuous grin as he served tastes of port, coupled with fine chocolate to the barrel tasters.   Yep, life’s pretty darn good!

Bennett at DeBeque Canyon Winery; Jay at Canyon Wind Cellars; Sue at Plum Creek Cellars; all of them – the epitome of Harlan Cleveland’s view about life:

If you try too carefully to plan your life, the danger is that you will succeed – succeed in narrowing your options, closing off avenues of adventure that cannot now be imagined.

Avenues of adventure – these business owners were probably all successful in previous career pursuits before opening their wine businesses; some of them continue in their profession while simultaneously operating a winery.  Have they found a passion in the form of a business?

Find a job you love and you will never work another day in your life.

                                                                          Unknown Sage

My wife has found “that job” – she’s in the leisure travel business.  She organizes group trips like this one; local, domestic and international; fun and interesting destinations, all.  How cool is that!

What about you?  Have you ever said that you are working in your current job only to make enough money so someday you can pursue that something you’ve always dreamed about?  How much money will it take?  When does “someday” arrive?  Maybe it’s today?  Go on – go for it!

GAP

How’s your day?  When life gets tough you could get a helmet – or, you could subscribe to my book The Peace & Power of a Positive Perspective©  Please visit www.TheQuoteGuys.com.

A Bear and a Beer

February – reminds me of my Dad.  February was his birth month (mine, too).  When I think about my Dad I can’t help but remember his perspective about how much things cost.  He’d always pine, “Oh, the cost of gas is outlandish!” (And that was back when we only paid $1.75 per gallon).  Or he would complain about the price of bananas; milk; beer; you name it.

If you have “Depression Era Babies” in your family, I bet you’ve heard these complaints too.  Now, I don’t like over spending any more than the next guy, but I try to focus on the fact that I am truly blessed.   Of course, I get that annual shock about this time of year, too, when my W-2 shows up in the mail.  Reminds me of the saying from that unknown Sage, “When I first started working I used to dream of the day when I might be earning the salary I’m starving on now.”

And when my annual 401-k statement arrives?  Well, my Dad’s complaints on how far a dollar can’t go any more come back to mind.  I think of the,

“Market Terminology for Dummies:

Bull Market –  A random market movement causing the investor to  mistake himself for a financial genius.

Momentum Investing – The fine art of buying high and selling low.

 Standard & Poor – Your investment strategy in a nutshell.”

                                                                           Mailbits.com

So it’s obvious by my 2010 W-2 (coupled with my investment portfolio) that I’m going to be working for “a while”.  Let’s just say that I’m not quite to the point of being a Wal-Mart Greeter, but I am paying closer attention to where their employment application kiosks are located.  I’m trying not to let this keep me down, though – I love my work, and I’m blessed with my income.  I’d like to keep working as long as I’m physically able.  And if you saw my golf game you’d tell me not to retire yet either.  (Besides, Lisa Kwiecien once said, “The secret to a long marriage is a husband that travels.”)

However, like my Dad, I confess that I’m starting to pay closer attention to the price of things;   Norman Augustine, the former head of Martin Marietta Corporation, did, too.  He told the story of:

“A bear who, displaying a $5 bill, had entered a bar and ordered a beer and; the owner of the bar directed the bartender to give the bear the beer, saying that since the bear didn’t look very smart to only give it 25 cents in change.  Having done as he had been instructed, and having watched incredulously as the bear placidly sipped the beer, the bartender finally could no longer contain himself and sought to engage the bear in conversation.  You know, he said to the bear, we don’t get many bears in this bar.  To which the bear is said to have replied, at $4.75 a beer, it’s no wonder.

Funny thing about money; no matter how much we make, it’s not quite enough to take our minds off the price of things.  And how we deal with the delta between our take home pay and our household budget has a lot to do with our daily outlook, yes?  So whether it was my Dad’s continuously, friendly disposition, or that bear, placidly sipping his beer; both serve to remind me that my glass is truly half-full.

                                                                             GAP

How’s your day?  When life gets tough you could get a helmet.  Or, you could read The Peace & Power of a Positive Perspective©  Please sign up on www.TheQuoteGuys.com.