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It’s a not a diet…

I know I write often about the sales profession – which may not please some of my readers.  I also occasionally upset my marketing colleagues ( http://thequoteguys.com/2016/07/playing-our-position/ ).

I write less about dieting – which might please my fellow couch potatoes.  It occurred to me recently (while reclining on the couch watching athletic activities) that there is a connection between sales-prospecting and dieting.  Fascinating?  Well maybe not, but please read on.

The catalyst for my connection came recently when one of my clients whom I haven’t heard from in 3 years, called for a little assistance; the sales-prospecting kind of assistance.  I receive calls like his periodically; I bet doctors and dietitians do too.

Here’s the pattern: My client is going along; selling successfully; everything seems to be fine; and they think, “Thanks Gary – we’re good; we’ll call you when we need you.”  Kind of like when we’re at an ideal body weight and leading an active lifestyle.  Doctors; dietitians; personal trainers?  “We’ll call you when we need you.”

Then, some of us wake up one morning; get on the scale; and say, “Ishkabibble!  I need to go on a diet!”  Of course, when we seek professional guidance we hear, “It’s not a diet; it’s a lifestyle change.”  True?

If you’re like me, I’m not so good at a “lifestyle change”:

I’ve been on a diet for two weeks and all I’ve lost is two weeks. 

Totie Fields 

We know it’s true.  Having the right BMI; muscle mass; bone density; and related physiological attributes takes more than going on a diet – it requires a life style change including a big helping of daily discipline.

Back to my client who made “the call”.  Business is down; their sales pipeline is empty; their calendar is void of upcoming appointments; let’s call Gary.  (They must have really been desperate.)

Unfortunately, my message was not what they were hoping for; which reminds me of one of my favorite book titles by Rick Paige:

Hope is not a strategy© 

IMHO, when endeavoring to sales-prospect, you can’t simply blitz your target market for a week or a month and expect success as measured by a filled sales funnel and over-achievement of sales quota.  To avoid the lifestyle change I suppose you could outsource lead-gen; you could have gastric bypass surgery too.

Sales-prospecting is a mind-set; as regular of a routine as eating right and exercising regularly.  It is a week-in and week-out discipline that compliments the efforts made, and assets provided by, our marketing colleagues.

So here I was talking with one of my couch-potato-sales-prospecting clients, thinking of the comparison of their sales-prospecting needs (and complaints) to my need (and complaints) to dieting.  Or rather, “making a life style change”!  Filling the pipeline on the one hand; eliminating the plates of calories on the other; both requiring a day-in and day-out commitment to success.

Both requiring a thought process change:

Question:     Is beer bad for you? 

Answer:        Look, it goes to the earlier point about vegetables.  As we all know, scientists divide everything in the world into three categories: animal, mineral, and vegetable.  Well, we all know that beer is not an animal, and it’s not on the periodic table of elements, so that only leaves one thing, right?  My advice:  Have a burger and a beer and tell everyone you’re on a vegetarian diet. 

Unknown Sage 

So, we agreed to schedule weekly meetings to restart their sales-prospecting “lifestyle” change. Question:  Should I drink beer during our sessions?

GAP

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Doing alright…

“How are you doing?”  A common greeting these days, yes?  Our response often depends on our mood, true?  For many, we have a choice over our moods; a degree of control; at least a consciousness of why we are in the mood we are in.  But not all of us…

Dedicated to those amazing people who unlike me, face each day “doing alright”; which means so much more:

Like Eric.  I have known Eric for 40 years today – his birthday.  Over that period Eric’s Mom and Dad have shared some of his most joyous occasions; and some of his most upsetting events; and in between these highs and lows Eric would tell you that he has been doing alright.  And for Eric, doing alright shows how amazing he truly is.

You see, Eric is the strongest person I know.  I’ll give you an example.  Close your eyes and return to the happiest day of your life – feel how you felt during your most exhilarating moments.  OK, now think back to how you felt on your saddest, darkest, most depressed day ever.  Just set those mental bookmarks in your mind’s eye.  There is an unbelievably wide and powerful range of human emotion, yes?

For most of us, we migrate from our highest highs and our lowest lows slowly; with long, “recovery” spans of simply feeling average in between.  Unfortunately, Eric is different; his mood swings back and forth, between euphoric highs and debilitating lows in a matter of minutes – multiple times – every hour!  Now picture your life with his type of mood swings – as if our other challenges aren’t enough to deal with.

Rapid Cycling – that’s the technical term for Eric and others who suffer from Bi-Polar Disorder.  And Eric lives every day with this unwelcome guest.  Medical science is not much help.  Bi-Polar Disorder is an affliction of the brain; and very difficult to properly diagnose and treat.  Trial and error, mostly.  That means people with Bi-Polar Disorder typically wind up dealing with this on their own.

Most can’t hold down a steady job.  Eric can – and he has consistently been a “go to” person for his company.  He is a skilled tradesman; good with customers; dependable; hard working; shows up no matter what; a positive attitude that no job is too tough; that’s Eric.  Most people with Bi-Polar Disorder can’t live independently.  Eric does – and if you met him, you would never know the internal turmoil he is living with.  He has a pleasant personality; a great smile; a nice sense of humor; knowledgeable of current events; just like the rest of us.

But Eric isn’t really like the rest of us.  Just getting up and facing the day; every day; takes enormous strength.  And he offers no excuses – never has.  Eric has earned success and experienced failure.  No matter; Eric treats each day anew, the best he possibly can. And when you greet him saying, “Hi. How you doing?”  you will almost always hear him say, “I’m doing alright”.

If Eric does alright each and every day even though feeling these uncontrollable mood swings – should we do any less?

No, I don’t have Bi-Polar Disorder, but it lives next door. And though I don’t have it, I can see first-hand the strength Eric has as he lives with it.  I’m very proud to say that Eric is my son.  And one day I hope to learn the source of his amazing strength so I too can be, “doing alright”.

GAP

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April 20, 1999 never forgotten…

Seventeen years ago today, my hometown experienced the terror that two teenagers, feeling a sense of hopelessness, can bring to their high school, their community and our nation.  It was considered a rare event back then – unfortunately, it has become increasingly more common today.

Life is hard and can often seem hopeless for all too many youths in their teens and twenty’s.   If you have a son or daughter; grandchildren; nieces or nephews; or neighborhood kids; hug them today.

Tell them today that you love them and will support them as they make their way in the world to adulthood and self-sufficiency.  And if they are struggling to make ends meet – give them a few bucks.  Help them find a job.  Today, help them feel they belong.

Let’s reverse our society’s violence.  Let’s use our power of self confidence to increase the sunlight for those heading towards darkness:

It takes the sun to create a shadow – accept that the dark and the light live side by side in all of us.                           

Chellie Campbell

It’s not just my home town of Littleton – We are all Columbine:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i9Seqhcq23M

May you feel peace – and share the power of peace with others – today, and everyday!

GAP

To the Road Warriors…

I used to be a Road Warrior.  My boss still is one.  The toughest kind too – international travel!  Last century business travel was an adventure – first class upgrades; upscale hotels; prepared meals; interesting destinations.

Business travel also played an important role in long-lasting relationships:

The secret to a successful marriage is a husband who travels. 

Lisa Kwiecien

In this century we have seen a great deal of change in the travel industry – to the detriment of Road Warriors.  If you know a Road Warrior (or are married to one by chance), let’s all take a moment to salute how they literally go the extra mile to earn a living.  Add in inclimate weather and holiday congestion and our Road Warriors work extra hard for each and every extra mile.

Current or former – all Road Warriors have those one or two “you had to be there” stories, true?  Don’t get me wrong – our stories are not always ones of disaster.  More along the lines of overcoming adversity I would say.

Here’s an excerpt from my favorite story – it’s the one that literally launched Penny or a Pound Publishing and my hobby of motivational writing.  Enjoy:

            How Steve & Gary Made it Home for Christmas

Christmas week and I’m in Baltimore, Maryland.  In this post-9/11 world the airlines have been transformed.  It used to be you could just show up at the airport and change your ticket to another flight almost at will.  Especially for us seasoned, “1 K”, Road Warriors.  But in 2006, not so much.  Well, I was booked on an evening flight home on Wednesday, December 21st and in over 25 years of business travel; I had never not made it home for the holidays.

Wednesday – I was wrapping up my last business trip of the year.  We just finished lunch so I checked messages before going into my last meetings of the day.  The first voice mail message was from the airline – a computer generated voice told me my flight home has been cancelled.  The second message was from my wife – “it’s snowing heavy in Denver” with a little more than just a matter-of-fact tone in her voice.  My first call was to neither the airline nor my wife – I called the hotel I had checked out of earlier that morning and reserved a room for tonight; just in case.  (Not my first rodeo.)  I’d call my wife back later.

My client decided to shorten our afternoon meetings – after all, it was four days before Christmas.  They thought maybe I could catch an earlier flight home.  I thanked them for their consideration without mentioning the weather conditions in Denver.  In the taxi back to the hotel I called my wife.  “We’re having a blizzard” she blurted, “They’ve closed the Denver airport” and followed almost crying,” Are you going to be able to get home for Christmas?”  “Sure Dear”, I responded, “Don’t worry.  You know I’ve been a Road Warrior for 20 years.  I’ll make it home just fine.” 

I listened to see if she heard any hint of confidence in my voice while in the back of my mind I was wondering, “How the hell am I going to get home for Christmas?”

If you’d like me to email you the full story – let me know.  And if you’d like a hard copy of my booklet Road Warriors © please include your mailing address.

Here’s to those who travel for a living today.   I don’t miss it one bit.

GAP

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You’re fired…

No one wants to hear those words – they sting.  Unfortunately in today’s real world, companies sometimes need to “go in a new direction”.  When one loses our job, it tests our toughness; our resolve; even our identity:

Failure is the greatest opportunity I have to know who I really am. 

John Killinger

A client of mine called me recently; he had just been “given his walking papers” by the firm that hired him 12 months previous.  His sales results weren’t acceptable; his firm was “going in a new direction.”  It stung.  We talked about it for a while.  In reality, he wasn’t happy in that role anyway; he wasn’t performing up to his standards; he wasn’t making money; he wasn’t happy; he knew it wasn’t “him”.  It was time to move on.

Amazingly that same day not 30 minutes after we spoke, I received a call from his boss.  He called to tell me he had to let his sales rep go; needed to “go in a new direction”; generate better sales results.  It stung.  We talked about it for a while.  The reality was he had given his sales rep sufficient time to perform.  It simply wasn’t working out; no one was happy; letting a sales rep dangle and starve wasn’t “him”.  It was time to move on.

This remarkable coincidence of these two conversations immediately flashed me back.  It was February of 2011; and it stung.  (See http://thequoteguys.com/2011/02/the-obvious-choice/ )  The sting has faded somewhat, but not the memory – never the memory.

The good news is my sense of humor back then was up for the challenge.  When I joined the conference call that day, I knew what was coming.  The executive who hired me was joined on the call by my new Sales Manager, and a representative from HR.  They informed me that the company was “going in a new direction – without me”, my initial response was, “You know, it’s not too late to change your mind.”  We all chuckled, but it stung.

Tom Hopkins once wrote:

I never see a failure as failure, but only as the opportunity to develop my sense of humor.

Actually the toughest part of that experience was telling my wife.  Thankfully, she dealt with it.  I suppose sticking with me for over three decades of the highs and lows of a professional salesman helped her develop her sense of humor, too.

As it turned out, “going in a new direction” was better for me than if that company had decided not to.  Don’t get me wrong – I really liked that job.  I felt my initial sales performance was pretty good; and I could have become a stellar producer for them if given a little more time.

But how much more time?  That’s the sticky wicket for business leaders, true?  When I’ve been on the other side of that discussion I must admit I have been impatient for performance.  When in doubt (when the person wasn’t “the obvious choice”) I have made the roster move; “gone in a new direction”.

It’s not revolutionary, really.  Business leaders have done this since last century (even longer):

Failure is the opportunity to begin again more intelligently. 

Henry Ford

So the advice I offered my two colleagues that day when they both called me simultaneously, was yes – it was time to go in a new direction.  And learning from the experience, do so more intelligently with our sense of humor intact.

GAP

Did you like this little ditty?  You might enjoy my website and book, too:  The Peace & Power of a Positive Perspective© Please check it out.

Cowboy Up!

 

We’re past the midpoint of Denver’s National Western Stock Show & Rodeo.  Never been?  If not, you should definitely add it to your fantasy list that I spoke of last week (see 2014 – A Year of Fulfillment?).

Denver’s National Western is a great opportunity for those of us from urban roots to walk a mile in the shoes of those with rural roots.  As a bonus, you can mingle with cowboys large and small!

Hayden-1-14-2014

There’s much we can apply today that originated from the farm; the ranch; and the Old West.  James P. Owen in his book, Cowboy Ethics: What Wall Street Can Learn From The Code Of The West© does a better job than I can in describing many of these applications.

We don’t have to be a cowboy to “ride for the brand”; and “the brand” can be both our professional brand as well as our personal brand.  Much has been written about the term brand (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brand ).  I would summarize it simply:

Brand identifies what makes one distinct from others.

What makes your personal brand “distinct”?  What is the cowboy in you?  Do you use cowboy logic when sizing up situations?

Cowboy secrets to life’s success:

1. Don’t let your head strap your hand to anything your butt can’t ride.

2. Never corner anything meaner than you.

Unknown Sage

This excerpt from my book I try to apply to my personal brand every day:

Dedicated to the American Cowboy – may we all learn to be more like them. 

Now, I’m no cowboy; but I know one.

Cowboys are quiet, polite – men of few words; comfortable just listening while others around them bark at the moon nonstop.

No, I’m no cowboy; but I’ve heard one.

Cowboys have a reserve of strength far and above the average person – physical strength to be sure; but also great emotional strength.

I’m definitely no cowboy; but I’ve seen one.

Cowboys have the ability to remain in control even while every living thing around them, man and beast, spooks in mortal fear.

True, I’m no cowboy; but I’ve been protected by one.

Cowboys remain focused even with adrenaline rushing through their veins when they’re bull riding, or racing flat out, one-handed on horseback, to rope an escaping calf.

Yes, I’m no cowboy; but I’ve lived with one.

Cowboys are fearless especially at the age of 15 when they look down in the chute and prepare to mount a bare back bucking bronco at their very first high school rodeo competition.

Absolutely, I’m no cowboy; but I’ve filmed one looking down that very chute.

Cowboys always believe they can.  The cowboy feels that sigh of relief when he’s all twisted up in the dirt, having fallen off a stumbling horse and the rodeo announcer comes on the PA system and says, “Well folks, he’ll have an option for a re-ride.”

So, I’m no cowboy, but I’ve sat next to his Mother in the stands when we heard that Rodeo Announcer come over the P.A. System to say, “Well folks, he’ll have an option for a re-ride.” And as the announcer glanced down to the stands to see her reaction he quickly added, “But his Mother says NO!”

You see, I know a lot about cowboys.  That’s why I’m so sure I’m not one.  No, I’m no cowboy, but my son Kevin is.  And every day I try to be a little bit more like him.

GAP

Did you like this little ditty?  You might enjoy my website too:  The Peace & Power of a Positive Perspective© Please check it out.

Here’s to you – Business Travelers…

I’m just back from a Pasadena “fantasy” trip (more on that next post); headed out on my first 2014 business trip.  Oh yea, now I remember what air travel was like!  Let’s take a moment and salute our army of business travelers (aka “Road Warriors”).

Thankfully, I’ve been off the road and lost all of my 1K; Platinum; Gold; Premium; Preferred status levels.  Back in the day business travel used to be tolerable.  Back in the day, business travel also played a role in our relationships:

The key to a successful marriage is a husband who travels.

Lisa Kwiecien

It’s difficult for those of us who don’t have to travel for a living to fully appreciate the hardships of those who do.  The Road Warrior works an extended day; starting early to beat traffic to the airport; working late to catch up on emails.  Preparing for tomorrow’s appointments after completing today’s.  Hearing from the spouse about what broke at the house; unable to assist with the repairs.  All done during different time zones, before or after what everyone else considers “normal business hours”.

Yes, being “on the road” is tough.  At least such challenges don’t dampen the Road Warriors’ sense of humor – nor that of the airline employees working on their behalf:

After every flight, pilots fill out a form called a gripe sheet, which conveys to the mechanics problems encountered with the aircraft during the flight that need repair or correction.  The mechanics read and correct the problem, and then respond in writing on the lower half of the form what remedial action was taken, and the pilot reviews the gripe sheets before the next flight.

Never let it be said that ground crews and engineers lack a sense of humor.  Here are some actual logged maintenance complaints and problems as submitted by pilots and the solution recorded by maintenance engineers. (By the way, this airline is the only major airline that has never had an accident.) 

P = The problem logged by the pilot.  S = The solution and action taken by the engineers.    

P:  Left inside main tire almost needs replacement.

S:  Almost replaced the inside main tire. 

P:  Test flight OK, except auto-land very rough. 

S:  Auto-land not installed on this aircraft. 

P:  Something loose in cockpit.   

S:  Something tightened in cockpit. 

P:  Dead bugs on windshield.

S:  Live bugs on backorder. 

P:  Autopilot in altitude-hold mode produces a 200 feet per minute descent.

S:  Cannot reproduce problem on ground. 

P:  Evidence of leak on right main landing gear. 

S:  Evidence removed. 

P:  DME volume unbelievably loud. 

S:  DME volume set to more believable level. 

P:  Friction locks cause throttle levers to stick.    

S:  That’s what they’re there for. 

P:  IFF inoperative.    

S:  IFF always inoperative in OFF mode. 

P:  Suspected crack in windshield.

S:  Suspect you’re right. 

P:  Number 3 engine missing. 

S:  Engine found on right wing after brief search. 

P:  Aircraft handles funny.  

S:  Aircraft warned to straighten up, fly right, and be serious. 

P:  Target radar hums.  

S:  Reprogrammed target radar with lyrics. 

P:  Mouse in cockpit.   

S:  Cat installed. 

P:  Noise coming from under instrument panel.  Sounds like an elf pounding on something with a hammer.  

S:  Took hammer away from elf. 

Unknown Sage 

Yes here’s to you, Business Travelers; to a stellar 2014; to getting there and back; traveling home safe; thank you for all that you do.

GAP

Did you like this little ditty?  You might enjoy my website based on my book, too:  The Peace & Power of a Positive Perspective© Please check it out.

To the Road Warriors…

I used to be a Road Warrior.  My boss still is one.  The toughest kind – international travel!  Last century business travel was a fun adventure – free upgrades; upscale hotels; prepared meals; interesting destinations. 

Business travel also played an important role in long-lasting relationships: 

The secret to a successful marriage is a husband who travels.  

Lisa Kwiecien 

In this century we have seen a great deal of change in the travel industry – most of it to the detriment of Road Warriors.  If you know a Road Warrior (or are married to one by chance), let’s all take a moment to salute how they literally go the extra mile to earn a living.  Add in inclimate weather and holiday travelers and our Road Warriors work extra hard for each and every extra mile. 

Current or former – all Road Warriors have those one or two “you had to be there” stories, true?  Don’t get me wrong – our stories are not always ones of disaster.  More along the lines of overcoming adversity I would say. 

Here’s an excerpt from my favorite story – it’s the one that literally launched Penny or a Pound Publishing and my quite satisfying hobby of motivational writing: 

            How Steve & Gary Made it Home for Christmas 

Christmas week and I’m in Baltimore, Maryland.  In this post-9/11 world the airlines have been transformed.  It used to be you could just show up at the airport and change your ticket to another flight almost at will.  Especially for us seasoned, “1 K”, Road Warriors.  But in 2006, not so much.  Well, I was booked on an evening flight home on Wednesday, December 21st and in over 25 years of business travel; I had never not made it home for the holidays.

Wednesday – I was wrapping up my last business trip of the year.  We just finished lunch so I checked messages before going into my last meetings of the day.  The first voice mail message was from the airline – a computer generated voice told me my flight home has been cancelled.  The second message was from my wife – “it’s snowing heavy in Denver” with a little more than just a matter-of-fact tone in her voice.  My first call was to neither the airline nor my wife – I called the hotel I had checked out of earlier that morning and reserved a room for tonight; just in case.  (Not my first rodeo.)  I’d call my wife back later.

My client decided to shorten our afternoon meetings – after all, it was four days before Christmas.  They thought maybe I could catch an earlier flight home.  I thanked them for their consideration without mentioning the weather conditions in Denver.  In the taxi back to the hotel I called my wife.  “We’re having a blizzard” she blurted, “They’ve closed the Denver airport” and followed almost crying,” Are you going to be able to get home for Christmas?”  “Sure Dear”, I responded, “Don’t worry.  You know I’ve been a Road Warrior for 20 years.  I’ll make it home just fine.” 

I listened to see if she heard any hint of confidence in my voice while in the back of my mind I was wondering, “How the hell am I going to get home for Christmas?” 

If you’d like a copy of the full story – just let me know. 

Thankfully today, I’ve lost all of my Elite, Premier, Platinum, statuses.  I don’t miss it one bit. 

GAP 

Did you like this little ditty?  You might enjoy my website and book, too:  The Peace & Power of a Positive Perspective© Please check it out.

One of “those” days…

I cut myself shaving this morning – of all mornings.  Was it going to be one of “those” days?  I was getting an updated head shot on my LinkedIn profile later today.  Ut-oh: 

            Murphy’s Law 

If anything can go wrong, it will. 

Well, maybe no one will notice.  I headed off to the office, just like any other day: 

            Maah’s Law 

Things go right so they can go wrong. 

Upon arrival, I discovered that I had left my briefcase (with office keys and computer) at home. Ut-oh.  Guess I was preoccupied with stopping the bleeding on my chin.  As I retrieved the necessary tools of my trade I experienced what the morning reverse-commute is like: 

            Law of Life’s Highway 

If everything is coming your way, you’re in the wrong lane. 

I returned a bit late but ready to face the day; the first incoming call came from one of my colleagues.  He asked if I knew how to run this new application we were given to create content for our learning management system.  Like me, he had received instructions on how to use this program from our application expert.  Ut-oh.  Like me, he followed the instructions as best he could. And like me, he was now reaching out to someone other than our “expert” for assistance, because: 

            Rudnicki’s Nobel Principle 

Only someone who understands something absolutely can explain it so no one else can understand it at all. 

We ignored the biblical prophecy of “the blind leading the blind”; avoided the ditch; and figured out how to record his content; although it consumed the rest of my morning. 

Trying to break the pattern of one of “those” mornings, during my lunch hour I read a few posts in my LinkedIn Groups.  One Group comprised of sales and marketing executives, had this post, “What concerns you most about the new year?”  Ut-oh. 

I responded to this post because I believe the sales profession is (or at least should be) a profession of optimism.  A post about “concerns” can be made by anyone I suppose, but for us sales professionals, we look at the world through a different lens: 

            Too much respect for problems kills faith in possibilities.  

Unknown Sage 

I felt better after sharing the Unknown Sage’s perspective with the “concerned” sales executive.  But then the phone rang.  Ut-oh. 

It was one of my clients calling to complain about an email he received from one of my other colleagues.  I agree with you – I’m thinking he should have just called her vs. me, but hey – it was definitely one of “those” days. 

After clarifying his issue (which could have been easily resolved by calling my colleague vs.me), I was tempted: 

Look, do you want to make a decision on this?  Or do you just want us all to drive home tonight and feel bad about it?

John F. Akers 

But for some odd reason a scene from Shakespeare’s 1596 play Henry IV, Part One, popped into my head reminding me that, “discretion is the better part of valor”.  So I agreed to speak to my colleague on his behalf, which I did.  She resolved his “concern”.  And I headed to a meeting: 

Oh, you hate your job?  Why didn’t you say so?  There’s a support group for that.  It’s called everybody, and they meet at the bar. 

Drew Carey 

Now that’s my kind of meeting when I’m having one of “those” days – you? 

GAP 

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Mood…

Are you “in the mood”?  Can those around you tell?  I suppose the definition of the word mood takes on different meanings for different people depending on the setting.  For instance; 

You know That Look women get when they want sex?  Me neither.

Steve Martin 

Mood – quite the word for current times.  I’ve noticed in my work, it really doesn’t matter if I’m “in the mood” or not – my manager makes it clear that either me, or my successor, will get the job done.  I’d rather it be me; even if it sometimes makes me a bit moody.  You? 

There’s that word “mood” again.  And in a business setting, we usually add in “positive” or “negative” adjectives.  According to Wikipedia; 

Negative moods are basic psychological states that can occur as a reaction to an event or can surface for no apparent external cause. Since there is no intentional object that causes the negative mood, it has no specific start and stop date. 

No specific start or stop date?  Scary!  Best to avoid negative moods, true?  Wikipedia goes on; 

For positive moods; People seem to experience a positive mood when they have a clean slate, have had a good night sleep, and feel no sense of stress in their life. 

A clean slate; good night’s sleep; no sense of stress – hmmm.  I think I can remember what that felt like back in the day.  But today, I probably speak for many of us by saying we definitely feel a sense of stress in our lives. 

However, most of us don’t have time to worry about our moods – too much to get done; not enough time; too little sleep; trying to clean our slates.  That’s one impact from a tough economy, just ask John Kirk Nelson; 

More and more these days I find myself pondering on how to reconcile my net income with my gross habits. 

Of course, we have plenty of political commercials shouting at us; telling us how we have been crushed; how tough it is to do something about the state of our slates.  Good material for the media I suppose.  I’m looking forward to the stop date for, “I approve this message.”  

Yes, life’s lessons have us completely surrounded; whether we choose to face each day with a positive mood or a negative mood.  To gain our bearings when dealing with our slates we might turn to our education (be it formal, informal, inherited, or tribal): 

Perhaps the most important result of all education is the ability to make yourself do the thing you have to do, when it ought to be done, whether you like it or not: it is the first lesson that ought to be learned; and however early a man’s training begins, it is probably the last lesson that he learns thoroughly.

Thomas Henry Huxley 

That sounds more like it.  We do what has to be done; no matter our mood; regardless of sleepless nights; whether we like it or not.  We get the job done. 

And we aren’t concerned about a stop date – while we can, this is who we are and what we do, to the best of our ability each and every day, regardless of the stress in our lives. 

Perhaps an NFL legend and Hall of Fame quarterback; said it best; 

Be happy today and everyday because you’re dead a long time.

 Johnny Unitas 

Speaking for Johnny, “I approve this message”!

GAP 

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