TheQuoteGuys

The Peace & Power of a Positive Perspective

Connect

Posts Tagged ‘Perserverance’

Crusty “Older workers”…

This topic (near and dear to my heart) surfaced recently while attending a webinar on how to coach high performing sales reps.  For some reason the presenter credentialed himself at the beginning as a “younger worker”.

I’m not sure how it happened, but we side-tracked away from the topic of high performing sales reps to motivating what the presenter termed “older workers”.  I think he was simply trying to cite a few examples of difficult coaching situations – but the examples he cited were those tired, old, sound tracks about we Baby Boomers.

His negative comments spurred me to the chat box.  Coincidentally there were quite of few of my Baby Boomer colleagues online.  So, when he said “older workers” are not coachable anymore; not technically savvy; not wanting to “go the extra mile”; his chat box filled up.  Unfortunately, things went downhill from there.

This “older workers” topic was featured in a recent article about Baby Boomers.  The main point of the article was older workers are not retiring at age 65.  Longer life spans; lower retirement savings; and higher cost of living were cited as reasons.  Our skilled productivity was barely mentioned.  The writer suggested we’re in the way; clogging up promotions and the advancement of younger workers.  I wondered if he just expected us to go away?

Look… (How’s that for a direct word we Baby Boomers are notorious for?)  When people write these articles or use such clichés to besmirch minorities; women; or other protected groups of people – FBI investigations, #movements, and woke responses are initiated.  But if the group in question is comprised of sexagenarians, people easily make wrong (and very hurtful) statements about us, seemingly without remorse.

I can’t speak for every profession in any industry but believe me; those of my generation still in technology sales are here because we want to be; not because we have to be.  We’re good at it.  If we come across to our managers as a bit “crusty”, it might just be that said manager does not know what motivates us.  A lot has been said about managing Millennials. When was the last session you attended that focused on motivating Baby Boomers?

True, we’ve already mentored, managed, led, coached, trained, hired, fired, promoted, parented, and grandparented others.  Even so, motivating us isn’t a bad thing.  A little respect for our knowledge and experience goes a long way.  Talking with us vs. avoiding us is greatly appreciated.

Permit me to offer three more tips that might help if you’re managing one of us crusty, “older workers”:

  1. False team hype doesn’t work very well – we prefer genuine comradery to contrived cheer leading and faux claims of company culture.
  2. The “if we don’t hit our number the sky will fall” hyperbole doesn’t move us.  We came up on draw vs. commission comp plans – no salary – no sales – no dinner.  If we made it this far, we’re already wired to hit our number.  If we don’t fire us; we’ll be OK.  You will be too.
  3. “Career progression” carrots are not carrots to us – at this stage we want career fulfilment not career advancement; there’s a huge difference.

Try discussing your concerns with us as if we were adults – after all, that’s how we used to do it when we were the boss.  BTW – many of us don’t want to be the boss anymore because we have learned, managing people is messy; especially those crusty older workers LoL!

GAP

Did you like this little ditty?  You might enjoy my past posts too: www.TheQuoteGuys.com

Dates never forgotten…

September 11, 2001 – we still remember.  What other dates are never forgotten for you?

In the novel, A Tale of Two Cities © is the contrast, “It was the best of times; it was the worst of times…” both occurring at the same time.  For Americans, 9/11 2001 seems like a demarcation point between the best of times before that morning and the worst of times after.  That’s when terrorism literally collided into freedom.

Do you remember where you were when news of the planes crashing into the World Trade Centers in New York was broadcast?  I always will.  In a flash our generation was tested on what we can endure during the worst of times.  December 7, 1945 tested my parent’s generation; October 24-29, 1929 tested my grandparents’.  On a more personal level April 20, 1999 was the worst of times for my home town.

It’s amazing what we can accomplish during the best of times; and what we can endure during the worst of times.  The bad times help us appreciate and enjoy the good times even more.

Our ability to gain strength from adversity should come as no surprise, though.  Our ancestry is made of up generations who endured and then grew stronger.  Much of today’s adversity pales in comparison to theirs.  Here’s what Ernest Hemingway said:

Life breaks us.  And when we heal, we’re stronger on the broken parts.

For many of us who did not suffer a direct loss of loved ones from these tragic events, our hardships now come in the form of inconvenience and economics.  We work harder today to keep up than we did before; travel has become more difficult; guns are all too prevalent in our society; in our schools; at our churches, malls, and theaters!

Things we once dreamed of seem further from our reach.  We have extended our resources close to the breaking point in defense of our country and our way of life.   But for America, that’s nothing new.  Our country has been on the brink; had parts broken; and healed back stronger for as long as we have been a country.  Were the hardships of the Revolution, the Civil War, the Viet Nam War, the Civil Rights Movement, or any other national, local, personal, or family crisis less hard?

We are up to facing today’s challenges.  We are strong because we come from generations of strength – families who struggled to make for this country, for their families, and for themselves the best of times.  Like past generations, Americans today have the opportunity to earn and enjoy the better things in life.  And we know why they are the better things:

To really enjoy the better things in life, one must first have experienced the things they are better than. 

Oscar Holmolka

So today we reflect on that never forgotten, life-changing event now known as 9/11.  Like the day an American walked on the moon, or the night the USA Olympic hockey team won the gold medal to Al Michaels’ famous words broadcast around the world, “Do you believe in miracles?”,  let’s turn to our favorite, Unknown Sage once again for this reminder:

The First Rule of Life:

The best things in life aren’t things.

Our country endured October 24, 1929 and the Great Depression; grew stronger after the December 7th, 1941 Pearl Harbor attack; my home town stands firm following the 4/20/1999 Columbine shooting; and I believe Americans remain united following the 9/11/2001 attacks.

Dates never forgotten.

GAP

Did you like this little ditty?  You might enjoy my past posts too: www.TheQuoteGuys.com

Friction…

I enjoy discussing and debating sales management “leading practices”.  Certainly, there are many opinions and many thought leaders that offer their knowledge and experience, too.  I suppose the opinions you align with are based on your context.

My context begins with sales managers and their sales reps epitomizing opposing forces.  I don’t mean we are enemies; but sales people and sales managers are often on opposite sides of things.  Lest your sales managers think they are “one of them” even if they used to be a sales rep, beware:

Coaches that worry too much about what fans think soon find themselves sitting with them in the stands. 

Unknown Sage

Now before going any further, permit me to acknowledge that my context and opinions about how things work may be very different than yours, and others’.  That’s OK:

Do not condemn the judgment of another because it differs from your own.  You may both be wrong. 

Dandemis

I remember many interactions where manager-rep “friction” occurred.  My first Presidents Club sales year as a “District Manager” (aka a sales rep) I worked for an “Executive-in-Training” (meaning he was hired from the outside vs. being promoted from within).  That created an opportunity to test our wills.

He ran Tuesday evening sales meetings and the rest of the week the District Managers worked out of sight, “managing” our districts.  We would come into the office periodically to file our paperwork.  (I know – the Dark Ages right?)

My manager fell into a pattern that every time I came into the office he would greet me with, “How’s your week?”  He wasn’t asking how I was doing; how the weather is; and was the family good…  He meant, how much business have I closed this week.  Friction.  I rebelled.

One day I asked him (told him, really) to stop.  I said, “Hello” is the greeting I would appreciate.  His approach made me feel that he thought of me only as my number.  I told him, “I am not my number”.

Years later I was on the sales manager side.  Walking a mile in his shoes was quite eye opening.  My Director and the VP above her were pounding on me for an updated forecast from my team.  “You-know-what” rolls downhill.  A rep of mine rebelled putting it this way, “Gary, no matter how much I sell it’s never enough.  You keep pushing the more button.”

Today, many sales managers have remote reps and as a result they have fewer face-to-face encounters which can cause additional anxiety.  And just when we thought the friction between managers and reps couldn’t get any worse, along came CRM.  Today, sales reps want to spend their time selling; sales managers want everything documented in the Customer Relationship Management system.

There are other examples … reps want “quality”; managers want “quantity”.  Many sales reps are conservative, sometimes to a fault, portraying pessimism about their forecast (aka “sand bagging”).  Sales managers push for optimism, and a higher commit!   Sales reps like building relationships; sales managers want to get in front of the prospect; close the deal; and move on.

I don’t know; maybe these opposing forces actually balance each other out.  Maybe it is the friction that actually drives an organization to sales success:

The highly successful use anxiety and stress to spur them on to achievement. 

Tom Hopkins

But balance is the key – too much friction on one side or the other can burn out the rep; or the manager; or even both, true?

GAP

Did you like this little ditty?  You might enjoy my past posts too: www.TheQuoteGuys.com

Independence – upheld…

Posted Jul 3 2019 by in True North with 4 Comments

Tomorrow, Americans celebrate Independence Day:

Independence Day is a federal holiday in the United States commemorating the Declaration of Independence of the United States on July 4, 1776.

Wikipedia

We truly are:It’s today however, when Americans should commemorate the event that upheld our country’s independence; the event that prevented the United States from being cut in half; and the horrific toll paid for our independence and unity to triumph.

July 3rd, 1863 was the third and final day of the Battle of Gettysburg.  Of all the Americans who have ever died in all the wars our country has ever fought, almost half – 620,000 – died in the Civil War.  And of all the Civil War battles, the one battle with the highest casualties was Gettysburg – 51,000 Americans.  And within the Battle of Gettysburg, Picket’s Charge on July 3rd, 1863 was the deciding, bloody clash.

I know in today’s society The Confederate States of America; their monuments; and their flag are easily vilified.  But 156 years ago, these battles were fought by Americans not by villains; by brave souls both North and South who believed their cause was necessary to preserve their country; their way of life.  They were committed enough that they were willing to die for it.

I believe every American should visit the Gettysburg National Military Park and pay tribute to the memory of those Americans that preserved the fate of our union.  Thankfully, that battle and a succinct commemoration by one of our greatest leaders, who also gave his life for his country, ultimately prevailed:

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate—we can not consecrate—we can not hallow—this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

That day Abraham Lincoln spoke to unite all Americans, North and South.  Today, July 3rd, is the day to remember that it was on this day and on that battlefield that ultimately resulted in the United States of America remaining united.

May God bless you; and may God bless America!

GAP

Did you like this little ditty?  You might enjoy my past posts too: www.TheQuoteGuys.com

A 20-minute window…

Posted Jun 5 2019 by in True North with 0 Comments

Tough topic tonight.  If you’re not up for it, now is a good time to bail – it’s OK.

If you have read me before you know that I believe there is peace and power in maintaining a positive perspective.  I believe positive perspectives are a gift we give to those around us.  And I know remaining positive in the face of life’s tragedies can be too much to ask.  Today, permit me to write about those who can’t.

There are many things that are people’s worst nightmare.  It’s certainly personal.  Among life’s list of terrible tragedies is teenage suicide.  That nightmare struck a friend and colleague of mine earlier this year.  It caught him and his family by total surprise – there was not a single early indication; not a single clue; his teenage son seemed totally normal in every way.  But he wasn’t.  Or was he?

According to the first part of this article published in Sales Marketing Magazine “What managers can do about suicide” (link):

…in 2016, suicide was the second leading cause of death among individuals between the ages of 10 and 34

Paul Nolan

Let that sink in for a moment… the second leading cause of death among our young people; as young as 10 years old.

The article goes on to cite additional, startling statistics, trends, and opinions but the conclusion offered is suicides are increasing and no one knows exactly why; nor exactly what the rest of us can do about it.

If isolation is a potential cause as some mental health experts suggest, then let’s at least start talking about this tough topic; let’s be more focused on our family, friends and co-workers; let’s add humanity back into our technology-laden world.

It won’t be easy in our daily multi-tasking, cell phone, app, texting world of distractions.   We will have to pay closer attention.  According to Susan Lindau a practicing therapist and adjunct professor at the University of Southern California who specializes in suicide and quoted in the article:

For many people in crisis, Lindau says, the most important thing is to get through a 20-minute window when they are the most tempted to end their lives. If they can reach out to family, friends or a co-worker and get through that moment, the pain won’t disappear, but they have much better odds of coming through the other side and moving toward treatment and recovery.

I know we all worry about many mortal risks.  Lord knows, the news media and our elected officials keep terrorism front and center.  But look at the comparisons.

According to the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism as published in Wikipedia (link), in 2016 there were 64 terror incidents resulting in 68 deaths and 139 injuries.  By comparison in 2016, there were 44,965 deaths by suicide.

44,965 vs. 68

I didn’t know that.

Our country’s fight against terrorism includes the popular phrase “see something – say something”.  Let’s use the same approach at work, home, and among friends.  Let us all commit to pay closer attention to the moods of those around us.  If they seem to be acting “different”, let’s take a moment for a caring “check in”.  “How are you doing?”  “Things OK?”  “Let’s talk.”

It’s a 20 minute window. We can spare 20 minutes, can’t we?  If we can help them get through that moment there is hope.  They may reconsider; seek professional help; chose life over death.

See something?  Say something – please!

GAP

Did you like this little ditty?  You might enjoy my past posts too: www.TheQuoteGuys.com

Doing alright…

“How are you doing?”  That is a common greeting these days, yes?  And our response often depends on our mood.  For many, we have a choice over our moods; a degree of control; a consciousness of why we are in the mood we are in.  But not all of us…

Dedicated to those amazing people who unlike me, face each day “doing alright”; which means so much more:

Like Eric.  I have known Eric for 43 years this coming Saturday – his birthday.  Over that period Eric’s Mom and Dad have shared some of his most joyous occasions; and some of his most upsetting events; and in between these highs and lows Eric would tell you that he has been doing alright.  And for Eric, doing alright shows how amazing he truly is.

You see, Eric is the strongest person I know.  I’ll give you an example.  Close your eyes and return to the happiest day of your life – feel how you felt during your most exhilarating moments.  OK, now think back to how you felt on your saddest, darkest, most depressed day ever.  Just set those mental bookmarks in your mind’s eye.  There is an unbelievably wide and powerful range of human emotion, yes?

For most of us, we migrate from our highest highs and our lowest lows slowly; with long, “recovery” spans of simply feeling average in between.  Unfortunately, Eric is different; his mood swings back and forth, between euphoric highs and debilitating lows in a matter of minutes – multiple times – every hour!  Now picture your life with his type of mood swings – as if our other challenges aren’t enough to deal with.

Rapid Cycling – that’s the technical term for Eric and others who suffer from Bi-Polar Disorder.  And Eric lives every day with this unwelcome guest.  Medical science is not much help.  Bi-Polar Disorder is an affliction of the brain; and very difficult to properly diagnose and treat.  Trial and error, mostly.  That means people with Bi-Polar Disorder typically wind up dealing with this on their own.

Most can’t hold down a steady job.  Eric can – and he has consistently been a “go to” person for his company.  He is a skilled tradesman; good with customers; dependable; hard working; shows up no matter what; a positive attitude that no job is too tough; that’s Eric.  Most people with Bi-Polar Disorder can’t live independently.  Eric does – and if you met him, you would never know the internal turmoil he is living with.  He has a pleasant personality; a great smile; a nice sense of humor; knowledgeable of current events; just like the rest of us.

But Eric isn’t really like the rest of us.  Just getting up and facing the day; every day; takes enormous strength.  And he offers no excuses – never has.  Eric has earned success and experienced failure.  No matter; Eric treats each day anew, the best he possibly can. And when you greet him saying, “Hi. How you doing?”  you will almost always hear him say, “I’m doing alright”. 

If Eric does alright each and every day even though feeling these uncontrollable mood swings – should we do any less?

No, I don’t have Bi-Polar Disorder, but it lives next door. And though I don’t have it, I can see first-hand the strength Eric has as he lives with it.  I’m very proud to say that Eric is my son.  And one day I hope to learn the source of his amazing strength so I too can be, “doing alright”.

GAP

Did you like this little ditty?  You might enjoy my past posts too: www.TheQuoteGuys.com

Who’s tougher than you?

Spoken as a verbal tag line by “Lou from Littleton”, former radio sports talk show personality on the airwaves of Denver and beyond (“FIFTY THOUSAND WATTS OF POWER – 850 KOA – THE BLOW TORCH!”).

Lou’s real name is Tom Manoogian.  He was one of my favorite radio personalities – his distinctive verbal style originating from Detroit; catchy clichés; a Broncos homer; soft on his callers (referred to everyone as “cous” as in cousin); tough on company B.S.  How tough?  He left the broadcasting booth at KOA to buy a competing radio station so he could call the shots; do things his way.

Imagine if our remedy for office B.S. was to simply buy another company.  We can all agree that office B.S. is tough. But any job; families; friendships; relationships; politics; life in general are tough too.  Just about everything is competitive these days.  That’s OK – we’re tough enough:

I’ve been up against tough competition all my life.  I wouldn’t know how to get along without it. 

Walt Disney

Everyone dreams; for a few, dreams come true – if we’re tough enough.

While Lou was on the air, he made his callers feel so comfortable that they often related personal tales about overcoming adversity.  Sports challenges, for sure; but also stories of life’s trials and tribulations we all face sooner or later; less or more.  And if the caller was “J.K.” and J.K. had a story to share about overcoming adversity, at the end Lou would always add, “Who’s tougher than J.K.?” as testimony to J.K.’s triumph!

Lou applied his, “Who’s tougher than…” to sports stories of the day.  Comeback victories; beating the odds; under dogs slaying prohibitive favorites; any and all tales of victory; punctuated by Lou’s, “Who’s tougher than x, y, or z?”  Verbalized with gusto; articulated slowly; every syllable over emphasized. “WHO’S…TOUGH…ER…THAN!”

I thought of Lou from Littleton the other day on my drive home from the airport.  Actually it wasn’t “day”, it was night; actually, it wasn’t “night”, it was one o’clock in the morning.  Up for 19 hours, I wasn’t even home yet.  And of course, I was scheduled for a 9:00 a.m. meeting.  That’s what Road Warriors do.  I’m out of practice.

I used to be a Road Warrior back in the day.  Thirty years ago, these marathon work days occurred every week.  I never gave it much thought, other than “hang tough”; “just making a living”; “all-in for the big bucks”; “makin’ the donuts”; “who’s TOUGH…ER…THAN”.  Others may have lighter work schedules; but just about everyone has tough times of one kind or another, true?

Tough times don’t last; tough people do. 

Mike Shanahan

You’re right; many of us endure hardships at work and at home without ever taking off on a plane.  Many of us have to be tough just to make it to the end of a day; just to make it home; just to make ends meet.  So how do we get through?  Where does toughness originate?

Well, recognizing life’s struggles for what they are is a good place to start.  Having the right attitude goes a long way to getting us to the end of each day.  Associating with the right associates helps too:

Stick with the optimists.  It’s going to be tough enough even if they’re right.

James Reston

So, here’s to you and to your tough mindedness.  Here’s to your shear will power to overcome adversity.  Whether you call into the radio station or not; WHO’S TOUGHER THAN YOU!

GAP

Did you like this little ditty?  You might enjoy my past posts too: www.TheQuoteGuys.com

Smells like money…

Denver’s National Western Stock Show & Rodeo closed out its 113th consecutive year last weekend.  If you’ve never been, it’s definitely a must see.  I love being around western folk; American pride; tradition; and the values derived from hard work.  I love the smell of the barn.  For me, it’s motivational when dealing with the stress of today’s “modern” society.

I have written before about my favorite ritual when immersed in the tensions of life’s highs and lows; successes and failures – shoveling horse manure.  Yep, shoveling horse manure (in the pasture, not at the office) really has a calming effect on me.  I know most folks have a different ritual or approach when dealing with their ups and downs.

Nonetheless, business professionals can gain great benefit from ranchers, farmers, cowboys, English riders, and livestock.  For instance, if you own or even lease a horse, you know how motivational it can be.  Thinking about the price of hay alone gets me up and at ‘em in the morning!  Serves me right, I suppose, for ignoring the advice of our favorite, Unknown Sage who tells us:

Seymore’s Investment Principle:

Never invest in anything that eats.

And my corollary:

GAP‘s Reaction to Seymore’s Investment Principle:

Never buy anything that eats while you sleep.

Horses – smells like money alright.  Better get up and go sell somebody something today!

Speaking of sales, understanding a horse’s behavior is also beneficial to our profession because our prospects act a lot like horses.  For instance, if we’re not careful, we can spook our prospects.  And when we do, they cut and run and we never seem to catch them again, do we.  Spooking, aka “No decision”, is our biggest competitor.

I believe prospects act a lot like herd animals.  They shy from sales people and fear being “cut-out from the herd”, yes?  You probably have faced every excuse in the book when a prospect does not want to meet with you 1-on-1, even for a straight-forward; 30-minute; business conversation.

I was working with a team of sales professionals recently and suggested that even a prospect’s objections can have herd characteristics.  First, the prospect objects to our proposed price; then they don’t like our contract language; then it’s our payment terms; and then they want to delay order placement.  Before you know it we get stampeded by a whole herd of objections!

We can learn a lot from English style, hunter-jumper riders, too.  If you’ve ever watched those riders you know that as they approach each jump, they reach a critical, “Go” or “No Go” point, before the horse must leap.

Indecision on the part of the rider or the horse (or a prospect) can lead to a “train wreck”.  It’s another cross-over example of the great benefit sales professionals and business leaders can gain from horses:

Half the failures of this world in life arise from pulling in one’s horse as he is leaping.

Julius and Augustus Hare

Of course, western pleasure style riders don’t usually mix well with English style riders.  Come from different herds I suppose.  But whether western or English, it’s the horses, not the riding style; we learn important business lessons from.  If you are a sales leader and hear one of your sales reps complain about the difficulties of making his/her quota; their problems with a prospect; or pain they feel from losing a deal; you might offer this equestrian-oriented advice:

Cowboy-Up!

Or if you prefer:

English-Up!

Perseverance – like manure – smells like money.

GAP

Did you like this little ditty?  You might enjoy my past posts too: www.TheQuoteGuys.com

Bulldozers…

I was speaking with a manager recently; small talk mostly; family; friends; current events.  With the age of his children, he is more tuned into today’s primary and secondary education systems than I am.  (My wife and I have to rely on the Google Machine whenever we help our second grade grandson with his math homework.  How did we ever make it to this century!!!?)

Anyway, the manager was describing today’s trend of parental “participation” in their children’s schools.  It used to be referred to as “helicopter moms” or “helicopter dads”.  You know, hovering over their children and their children’s teachers and their children’s coaches; “helping” their sons and daughters succeed; risk of failure was not an option.

And just when we thought things could not get worse… he tells me today’s trend is “bulldozing parents”; not simply hovering, guiding, influencing.  No – today, many parents actually do the school work for their sons and daughters.  Today, they’re trying to bulldoze the risk of failure out of the equation altogether.

But will it work?  Will today’s grade schoolers and high schoolers become successful adults if their parents are “bulldozers”?  I guess we will find out in the future when they encounter their first hardship solo.  In the 21st century, do you think we can still learn from Attila the Hun?

Huns learn much faster when faced with adversity.

Wess Roberts

In the meantime, when these young ones enter today’s workforce, what will happen to them sans bulldozer parents?  As sales managers, what lessons cross over into the business world from our modern education (and parental) systems?

I was speaking with a sales director friend of mine recently – he likes to check in from time to time; he thinks “the old guy can still hunt”.  We were discussing front line sales management and the “principles of gravitational pull.”

He said he sees many sales managers working extra hard trying to help their under-performing sales reps.  A common phenomenon, true?  When I asked what extra hard work he sees sales managers performing with (or for) their under-performers… his testimony was predictable; “Well, they help their under-performers on sales calls…”  And there it stands – hidden in plain view – the gravitational pull of sales managers “jumping in” to rescue a deal they fear their under-performers would otherwise lose – “Bulldozing”.

The stark reality about under-performers – which research after research continues to confirm is – they aren’t going to make it.  The sales manager’s time is best invested with their top performers.  When the under-performers don’t make it, the sales managers’ “bulldozing” yields a handful of deals and lots of open positions (temporarily occupied or not):

Among the chief worries of today’s business executives is the large number of unemployed still on the payrolls. 

Unknown Sage

Easy for me to blog about – extremely hard to do in the “real world”… but IMHO rather than “bulldozing”, when a sales manager is in the field with an under-performing sales rep, the manager has to allow the rep to fail; even if it means losing the deal.  It’s what happens after the sales rep fails that counts:

It seems to me that the largest impediment to a healthy attitude toward failure is our inability to distinguish between just plain being stupid and failing on the way to great success. 

Unknown Sage

Bulldozers are commonly used to start construction projects.  But they are long gone before that project is successfully completed.  Failing to move the bulldozers out of the way would be plain stupid.

GAP

Did you like this little ditty?  You might enjoy my past posts too: www.TheQuoteGuys.com

Changing ways …

There are lots of things changing in our modern world today.  And our pace of change is amazing.  Modernization; automation; the Internet of Things; today’s changing ways goes by many names.  We assume these changes will be for the better; we’d like to believe in “new and improved”!

With today’s “new ways”, when we experience something that’s still being done the “old way” it stands out.

During a recent business trip, I rented a car and checked into a hotel.  You know, the usual stuff done the usual way.  The car rental experience seemed simple enough; the hotel check-in process?  Well, that struck me as something still being done the “old way”.

Why is it that it takes only a few minutes and no paperwork to pick up or drop off a rental car at Hertz’s #1 Club Gold, but twice that time and an annoying name/address form to check into a Hilton hotel?  Are they afraid you’ll steal the room? 

Michael Tracy

True, business travel affords us plenty of opportunities to poke fun at travel providers.  Poke fun aka the “old way”.  Complain, rant on social media sites, blast people and places on Trip Advisor… it seems like that is the “new way”.

Often these days, the new ways can stimulate increased strain and stress don’t they?  Call me kooky, but isn’t that the opposite impact “new ways” are supposed to contribute to society?   What do you think?

I mean, any kind of travel can be frustrating, yes?  Just commuting to or from the office has taken on new perils in our modern society.  You tell me; is road rage a “new way” or an “old way”?  Even Uber is not insulated from it.  Believe it or not, Wikipedia suggests this is actually the “old way” dating all the way back to 1987:

The term originated in the United States in 1987–1988 from anchors at KTLA, a television station in Los Angeles, California, when a rash of freeway shootings occurred on the Interstate 405, 110, and 10 freeways in Los Angeles.

I get it; it can be hard to embrace changing ways.  Especially for those of us who are comfortable doing things the “old way”.   Yes, yes, that way drives the kids crazy.  They’re amazed we have made our way to this point doing things the “old way”.  That’s OK.  Our way is not for everyone.

And you must admit that some things (travel or otherwise) ought not to be changed:

You’ll notice that the airport buildings are in the distance.  We don’t land at the terminal because it scares the heck out of the people inside. 

Mark Sanborn

But changing ways are inevitable.  And there are lots of smart people coming up with “new ways” everyday intending to make our life better.  They’re trying to avoid the strain and stress when “new ways” supersede “old ways”.  I suppose changing ways will always anger some.

Seth Godin reminds us all that it will be OK:

Do you have to abandon the old ways today?  Of course not.  But responsible stewardship requires that you find and empower heretics and give them the flexibility to build something new instead of trying to force the Internet to act like direct mail with free stamps.

During times of changing ways, we should not try to hold things back.  Even someone like me who often prefers the comfort of the “old way”, needs to step out of the aisle and let the other passengers by.

GAP

Did you like this little ditty?  You might enjoy my past posts too: www.TheQuoteGuys.com