The Peace & Power of a Positive Perspective


Posts Tagged ‘Personal Development’

Giving Advice…

Giving advice, now there’s a lightning rod topic.  It is a terrific compliment when someone solicits us for advice, yes?  However, when we give unasked for advice it can be received very differently.

It seems to me that advice-oriented conversations either progress (or digress) based on a variety of variables.  When should we speak?  When should we listen?  Whose advice should we follow?  How do we avoid that lightning rod?  Reminds me of a party:

Nothing makes me more tolerant of a neighbor’s noisy party than being there. 

Franklin P. Adams

But I digress.  I was approached by a young colleague seeking career advice last year.  He had two, internal opportunities; wanted my opinion on which one might be better.

His request was a compliment and a surprise.  I barely knew him; our jobs are unrelated; we didn’t even work on the same floor.  Nonetheless, he had been told I was some sort of seer or soothsayer or something so he sought me out for advice.  Of course, you already know how I feel about seers and soothsayers:

It seems to me that no soothsayer should be able to look at another soothsayer without laughing.


I agreed to meet; discussed his career options; answered his questions the best I could; offered him a little seeing and soothsaying.  With a “let me know how things turn out”, I wished him well.

That was last year.  I see him in the office from time to time; say “hello” at the coffee machine.  I’m thinking the fact that he’s still with the company is a positive indication.  If I were clairvoyant, I would know for sure if my advice benefited him.  Of course, you already know how I feel about clairvoyants:

At a recent annual meeting of the International Association of Clairvoyants, the meeting began by reading the minutes of next year’s meeting. 

Unknown Sage

I was reminded of this collegial career advice encounter recently as I was finishing up a weekly, 1-to-1 conference call with one of my clients.  These 1-to-1 meetings have been both a compliment and a surprise.  I do my best to encourage my client to set the agenda; drive the conversation; focus his priorities.  And he does get each meeting started down a certain path.

But then, after asking for my advice he sits back… and … proceeds to multitask.   I can literally hear him keyboarding in the background and I notice as he occasionally puts me on mute for a moment or two.  Upon my inquiry, he apologizes offering that a “client issue” just hit his in box and he’ll “only need a second to respond”.  This of course, makes me wonder what kind of client issue only needs a second to respond?  But I digress.

In reality he is my client and I strive to comply with my clients’ requests – even for 1-to-1 meetings listening to their multi-tasking.  This particular client is very tenured and very experienced so when he sends me Meeting Requests I take them as both a compliment and a surprise.  Perhaps I’m simply confirming what he already knows: 

Advice is what we ask for when we already know the answer but wish we didn’t. 

Emily Jong

Sometimes we just need someone to help us sound out what’s on our mind, true? Sometimes it’s the listening not the advising that matters.  If I were a better soothsayer or clairvoyant, I’d know when to speak and when to listen.  I’d be better at avoiding that lightning rod!


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C = E³ + Rᵑ

Yes, yes, you’re right – I wrote a little ditty recently poking fun at the mathematicians in our B2B sales profession (see ).  So, what’s with today’s formula?

Well, I was asked recently by a colleague why I was willing to meet with him monthly and offer coaching as he pursues a career change from high school teacher to financial planner.  It was one of those questions that caused me to pause and ask myself, “Why am I willing to coach him?”

Which relates to related questions such as:

  • “What does the coach get from coaching?”
  • “How does a good coach get better at coaching?”
  • “If you had the choice between playing or coaching, which would you choose?”
  • And, “What’s the difference among coaching, managing, and leading in today’s business world?”

Stimulated by my colleague, I reflected on these questions.  (Truth be told – I think he thinks there’s a catch to my coaching.)

Believe it or not, as it turns out the easiest way for me to wrap my mind around the discussion is with a formula.  (Mea culpa, mathematicians!)

Coaching = (Empathy x Emulation x Echo) + Repetitionᵑ         

(Lots of Repetition)

So here I am coaching my colleague and since our business relationship is in its infancy, he runs my coaching points past his Manager in order to triangulate what I think with what he thinks with what his Manager thinks as he endeavors to build his portfolio of clients.  (Truthfully, I think his Manager thinks there’s a catch to my coaching offer, too.)

Perhaps one reason why he’s open to meeting with me is the first “E” of my formula: Empathy.

When I entered the sales profession back in the day, I was totally uncomfortable with cold-calling; totally clueless about presenting; I didn’t know how to overcome objections.  I wasn’t alone.  I too had to learn how to master all of these skills in order to succeed.  So I can certainly empathize with his career change challenges.

Emulation?  That’s a “gift”.  You see, I have made a career of analyzing how buyers buy.  As Rick Page said in his best-selling book, Hope is Not a Strategy©:

Sell the way the customer buys and allocate your resources accordingly.

Echo?  Thank you Dr. Rick Jensen.  I met Dr. Rick in circa 1998 when he was a practicing sports psychology coach on the PGA tour.  One of his “patients” was none other than Tiger Woods.  Although Tiger was a better golfer than Dr. Rick (dah!) – he still gained great value (and significantly improved his competitive results) by having a psychology coach on his team.

You see, Dr. Rick provided a perfect mirror for Tiger to “see” his mental approach to his game.  And with this “reflection” Tiger could gain confidence that what he was doing was in fact what he wanted to do.

Like Dr. Rick; I try to be the mirror of today’s “Modern Buyer”.

Rah yes, Rᵑ.  Repetition – lots of repetition – never ending, professional repetition (aka “practice”).  And the best way to practice?  With a coach.

Of course, it wasn’t always that way.  Back in the Middle Ages, Attila the Hun was not exactly renowned as a great coach, leading great practice sessions.  His hordes had to learn from trial and error:

Huns learn less from success than they do from failure. 

Wess Roberts

The problem with that approach in the 21st century is we don’t have many hordes of Huns who can afford to learn from error, true?


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That word seems to be surfacing often these days.  During my annual physical my doctor expressed a bit of concern about my weight; which, obviously means I have too much of it.  He encouraged me to become “accountable” for my weight and my diet.

Of course, doing so requires a clear understanding of portion sizes; reading food labels; controlling my sweet tooth.  In short, I would have to put forth more effort.  Isn’t there an alternative to being accountable?  I turned to my favorite, Unknown Sage:

Question: How can I calculate my body/fat ratio?

Answer:   Well, if you have a body, and you have body fat, your ratio is one-to-one.  If you have two bodies, your ratio is two-to-one, etc.

Question: I’ve heard that cardiovascular exercise can prolong life.  Is this true?

Answer:   How could that be true?  Your heart is only good for so many beats, and that’s it.  Everything wears out eventually, so how could speeding up your heart make you live longer?  If you want to live longer – take a nap.       

Question: My wife says I should cut down on meat, and eat more fruits and vegetables.  What do you say?

Answer:   Look, what does a cow eat?  Corn.  And what’s corn?  A vegetable.  So a steak is nothing more than an efficient mechanism of delivering vegetables to your system.

Question: Is beer bad for you?

Answer:   Look, it goes to the earlier point about vegetables.  As we all know, scientists divide everything in the world into three categories: animal, mineral, and vegetable.  Well, we all know that beer is not an animal, and it’s not on the periodic table of elements, so that only leaves one thing, right?  My advice:  Have a burger and a beer and tell everyone you’re on a vegetarian diet.

Not exactly “accountable”, you say?  True enough.

That word “accountable” also surfaces often at the office these days – you too?  My colleagues are always saying, “We need to hold So-and-So more accountable”.  (It seems that So-and-So screws up often at my company; yours too?  But I digress.)

Luckily, I was recently invited to an accountability webinar featuring the author of a best-selling business book, The Oz Principle.  The “principles” and theories offered in the webinar were all well and good.  But, wouldn’t you know it?  So-and-So started his webinar titled “Holding Others Accountable”, late.  Then, 12 minutes into his late-starting webinar, I received an automated, email reminder to attend his webinar – 12 minutes after So-and-So’s (late starting) webinar had started!

Not exactly “accountable”, you say?  True enough.  The experience brought to mind T. Harv Eker’s opinion:

How you do anything is how you do everything.

OK, So-and-So screwed up.  The challenge might just be our propensity to want to hold others accountable vs. focusing on our own accountability.

Everyone who works here is expected to work toward being the best he can possibly be at the tasks he’s accountable for.  When he can’t do that, he should act like he is until he gets around to it.  And if he’s unwilling to act like it, he should leave.

Michael E. Gerber

It’s always easier to try holding So-and-So accountable, than applying those same, high standards to ourselves, isn’t it?  Reminds me of Ken Blanchard’s view:

Empowerment means you have freedom to act; it also means you are accountable for results.

Focusing on So-and-So vs. our own actions and responsibilities:  Not exactly “accountable”, you say?  True enough.


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Polar opposites…

I’ve been self-conscious about the appearance of my finger nails since high school.  Back then, I was a nail biter; today, my nails reflect my work around the barn.  In the white collar role of professional sales, it’s hard to hide the blue collar effects of working with hammers, horses and hay.  Seems polar opposite, yes?

Coaching vs. training are often polar opposites.  I enjoy coaching coachable sales professionals.  Role plays are my favorite! What’s that?  You hate role plays?  Ah yes, that’s the opposite pole.

Some sales reps like practice sessions; some hate it; many avoid practice because they’re “too busy”.  Too busy to practice?  Well, at least they’re not an eye doctor.  After all, we wouldn’t want to turn our baby blues over to an eye surgeon if we thought she hadn’t practiced the procedure a thousand times before, would we?  Medical professionals vs. sales professionals – polar opposites?

One of my clients recently told me he has been in a white collar, professional position as a business analyst in the IT industry for over 30 years.  His primary role has been doing implementations.  Now, he’s working for a new company who hired him for a “pre-sales” role to help them sell larger, more complicated deals.  His finger nails are immaculate.

He’s been playing the “I’m just too busy…” card lately, and opting out of practice sessions.  His company signed him up for coaching, it wasn’t his idea.  Yet, his main concern has been over my reaction to his cancellations; says he doesn’t want me to think it is a negative reflection on me.

It brought to mind an interview I conducted years ago with John Bruce.  John had been selling management consulting services.  I don’t think he had fared too well though.  First, he was interviewing with me for a new job.  Second, he had grime under his finger nails; a polar opposite image of a white collar professional, true?

When he noticed I had noticed his finger nails, he became a bit self-conscious.  As it turned out he was doing a little auto repair work the prior evening.  I wasn’t sure if he was working on his own car to save a little money, or if he was moon lighting to augment his income.  That’s when he confided his desire to succeed in this new position.

I asked him if he thought he was coachable.  His reply has stayed with me ever since:

“Gary, I’m all balls and no brains.  You coach me what to do and I’ll give you everything I’ve got.”

It was an exaggeration – John had plenty of brains.  Coachable he was, too.  He earned the job offer; sold at a President’s Club level; and improved his selling skills every step of the way.  Reminded me of Joe Newton:

If better is even possible, good is not enough.

Maybe it’s not in the finger nails or the polar opposites of white vs. blue collar.  It could be the coach who’s at fault.  Ever tried to train sales to a professional that isn’t coachable?  There’s a fine line between coaching someone vs. trying to force them to do it our way.

Coaching a sales professional requires (among many things) mutual consent – kind of like forming a partnership.  But beware – even partnerships can have polar opposite definitions:

Partnership means, 

“Let’s you and I agree to do things my way.”

Naomi R. Blakeslee

Sounds like marriage – but I digress.


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Principles of Power…

One of my colleagues, Chris Miller, coached a grouped of recent college graduates our company hired last quarter.  I thought his power sharing message was so empowering, I wanted to share it with you.

Speaking of power, I remember when leading my sales teams – I would trust their sales approach as long as they were above quota.  Chris would call that Reward Power.  However, when they were below quota I instructed them to do what I said; exactly the way I said; when I said; and my instructions were not open for discussion.  I suppose that was Position Power.  My team liked the former more than the latter so they tended to excel!

Speaking of leadership, earlier this year I toured the Gettysburg National Battlefield with my sons – a trip every American should make.  Gettysburg was the bloodiest, 3-day battle in American History; 53,000 casualties July 1-3, 1863.  It made me wonder what source of power the battlefield commanders had over their soldiers? I doubt it was Position Power.

How do you lead your teams; your relationships; and your life?

During Chris’ coaching session, he stated that there are many sources of power – some sources are more powerful than others.  Here’s his list:

  • Referent Power – The most powerful source of power.  It originates from Trust;
    • When Trust exists, you have access to every source of power available to the person trusting you.
  • Reward Power – The second most powerful source of power.  It involves catching someone in the act of doing something right.
  • Position Power – The least powerful source of power.  It leverages Coercive Power, but only for the short term.
  • Coercive Power – The 2nd least powerful source of power.  It offers leaders very few options;
    • Back-off and lose face.
    • Apply more coercion until completion.  This is a lose/lose approach and use of it cuts one off from Referent Power and Reward Power in the future.
  • Information Power – Being an expert brings us power.
  • Charisma; Wealth; and Love are all powerful.

Chris discussed dimensions of power:

  • Power is Historical – Protect our personal history; it can’t be rewritten.
  • Power is One Way – No one has more power than we choose to give them.
  • Power is Fragile – And can be easily abused.
  • Power is a Great Motivator.
  • Power Sharing is empowering – And creates even more power.
  • Admitting Mistakes increases power – Is it more important to be right or to have power?
  • Forgiveness is Empowering.

Chris described one, additional source of power and then concluded his remarks with the summary – Power, Value and Control are Interrelated.   The amount of power I am willing to give you depends on how much I value what you will control over me with it.

Speaking of this interrelation, that brings me back to Gettysburg.  The last power Chris included is his talk was Spiritual Power.  Spirituality is a powerful source of power.  I wonder if Spirituality was the power source for the soldiers during the battle of Gettysburg?  The extreme carnage would have been obvious to them. The likelihood that they would be killed had to have been on their mind.

Was it Spiritual Power, coupled with Value and Control that enabled their field commanders to command them?  Was it Spiritual Power that empowered them to sacrifice their lives for the Value of the United States of America remaining united?

Whatever their power source – it was definitely powerful!


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“Got it”; but can’t “Do it”…

While watching the 2013 British Open being played by the most skillful, professional golfers in the world – I was reminded of my golf game.  I was also reminded of my work over the past few years with young people who have chosen sales to start their post-collegiate career. 

In my role, I enjoy working with these 20-somethings; bright; intelligent; confident.  Some are very coachable.  Others?  Well, a common response I hear when working with some aspiring sales professionals is, “Got it”.  Of course, “Getting it” is not the same as “Doing it”; is it?  It’s the difference between having an intellectual understanding of something vs. having the skill to do that same something. 

Take my golf game.  When standing on the first tee, I have a clear understanding of how I’m going to hit my drive.  I feel my body weight evenly distributed in my stance; I have a firm (but not too firm) grip of the club.  Intellectually, I can see my ball-flight; launched down the left side of the fairway and landing center-right (aka: a high fade).  In my mind, I can hear the “crack” of the club head striking the ball; in my mind, I can visualize my balanced follow through.  Intellectually?  “Got it”. 

When I start my backswing – all bets are off! 

A golfer, searching for a ball lost deep in the rough, asked the caddie, “Why do you keep looking at that pocket watch?  It isn’t a watch”, the caddie said.  “It’s a compass.” 

                                  Unknown Sage 

When working with aspiring sales people, we cover many skill-based areas.  During their moments of glancing away from iPads and smartphones to check where I’m at, I get the nod, “Got it”.  The ability of young people to multi-task is amazing, isn’t it?  Their intellectual strength is awesome.  Thumb strength from texting?  Unparalleled!  Their ability to focus?  OK, maybe not so much. 

Did you see Tiger Woods’ opening drive at the British Open?  A duck-hook to an unplayable lie that ultimately resulted in starting the tournament with a bogeyPerhaps a harbinger of things to come.  The TV-Analysts stated that he never seemed to be mentally into the tournament; never able to summon a charge.  Maybe he was multi-tasking? 

When interviewed after his first round, Tiger told the reporters the reason why he hit that bad tee shot on the 1st hole was he had too many thoughts going on in his mind.  (See what I mean?) 

Ultimately, inexperienced sales people will discover in their pursuit of a sales career that the ability to focus; the ability to “Do it”; the realization that skill trumps intellect; will be their key to success. 

Don’t get me wrong – prospects appreciate the intelligence of sales professionals.  I spoke of the power of “thinking” in a recent post about the most powerful technology company on the planet (see “THINK”). 

It’s just that rising to the executive ranks in the sales profession, similar to earning the opportunity to compete in the British Open, requires more than intellect.  I worry about who thinks Martin A. Ragaway is right: 

            “EXECUTIVE” (high powered) 

A golfer who calls the office from a cell phone every five holes to make sure employees haven’t left for the day.                     

Yes, golf is a lot like sales.  To make any money in either pursuit, one must be skilled enough – and focused enough – to be able to “Do it”. 


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Be yourself…

Posted Nov 9 2012 by in True North with 0 Comments

Do you own a dog?  Every day I come home from work, regardless of the type of day I had at work, my dog is happy to see me.  

No matter my mood; no matter how preoccupied; no matter how frustrating my day was, there she is – tail wagging.  She loves me for whoever she thinks I am.  I think she knows the meaning of how to “be yourself” – if she could only talk.  We’ll come back to her later; let’s turn to more important things. 

Like Halloween.  What were you for Halloween?  Are you wearing another costume today?  At the office; with your friends; keeping up with your neighbors; your LinkedIn profile; it can be very tempting to portray ourselves as someone we really are not, yes?  Why is it that to “be yourself” is sometimes not good enough for us? 

Well, Halloween trick or treat and costume parties are behind us; the Presidential election too (thank goodness!); Santa Claus is finalizing his trip planner; there are plenty of opportunities to portray “someone else” these days, don’t you think?  We have all been around that someone we feel is not authentic, true?  (Not you or me, of course.)  How do you feel about that person?  Me too. 

I often wonder what it means to “be yourself”.  After all, reality TV shows aren’t real; YouTube videos are staged; Angry Birds is one of the most widely addicting mobile game apps of all time;  (Angry Birds?); and Infomercials are more mercials and less info, don’t you agree?  Fantasy worlds abound. 

Whatever it actually means to “be yourself”, that’s still not good enough.  Many of us continually strive to better ourselves.  Yep – New Years Resolutions are right around the corner. (By the way, I hope you are doing better with your 2012 resolutions than I am!)  Nonetheless, continually striving for self-improvement is constantly on my mind.  (And yes, I will start that diet – next week.)  

To help with my self-searching; “be yourself”; self-improvement journey, my son offered me this sage advice – courtesy of that renowned resource of truthfulness and transparency – Facebook:










I was Batman last year; this year, my Halloween costume was that of an American Cowboy.  Truth be told; it was actually only a half-costume.  You see – I’m no cowboy. 

This year I didn’t really take the time to find an actual American Cowboy costume for my wife’s Halloween party.  I simply went out to the garage; pulled the boots, hat, and duster I wear when feeding our horses during inclimate weather – whalla – one (inauthentic) American Cowboy!  

But that was not me; that’s not what it means to “be yourself”.  OK then – Where do we find the true meaning of how to “be yourself”?  Maybe cartoon characters can help.  I mean, the following is the philosophy of Charles Schulz, the creator of the ‘Peanuts’ comic strip:           

”Be Yourself. Everyone Else Is Taken!” 

(Boy, it must be difficult if I’m turning to a comic strip!)  So everyone is telling us to just “be yourself”.  Yet whoever I truly am, I know and I want to be better.  (Based on the annual revenue generated in the self-help industry I don’t think I’m alone.) 

At least we can turn to our favorite, Unknown Sage for advice about who we are and who we would like to become:










Lord, help me be the man my dog thinks I am.             


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What’s the point?

That’s the question Professor Karen Kampwirth asked of her political science students as they were discussing the book Sexual Politics in Modern Iran

It was my annual visit to Knox College and during Homecoming weekend classes are open to alumni.  This year, I selected the class “Antifeminism” – the title caught my eye – seemed “pretty cool”. 

Political Science – what’s the point, anyway?  I mean, when I was a senior in high school and planning a visit to Knox College they asked me what classes I wanted to sample.  Well, “back in the day”, I had no idea.  College curricula?  Clueless!  All I knew then is my parents wanted me to go to college; get a degree.  I didn’t know I wanted to be when I grew up. (Still don’t, actually.) 

During my 1971 visit I must have said I was interested in Political Science; that was the class I sampled.  It was a lecture I remember; about 90 students sat in an elevated, theatre-style lecture-hall.  The professor was down in the center on what seemed to be a small stage, behind a podium.  I don’t remember anything about the professor or the lecture, but the room was pretty cool.  

Ah yes – pretty cool – a key decision criteria of an eighteen year old, high school senior in 1971.  Four decades later, as a career sales professional, it’s amazing how many prospects make their final decisions on the one that looked pretty cool.  I wonder if they were Political Science majors? 

Back to Professor Kampwirth.  I enjoyed her skill in leading the class.  She managed the agenda; kept track of time; asked profound and stimulating questions; and offered key insight beyond what the text book and her students’ personal knowledge afforded. 

Skills surprisingly similar to what career sales professionals do!  And after allowing her class time to delve into the “technical specs” of the political science topic, she leveraged the thought-provoking technique of asking, “What’s the point?”  

I mean, I don’t know how scientific political science really is, but Professor Kampwirth stimulated superior discussion and learning processes with her skillful mastery of agenda management, coupled with audience participation.  Pretty cool! 

Another dichotomy stood out during class.  For visual aid support, this classroom was outfitted with a chalk board – which Professor Kampwirth actually wrote on (real chalk, too!).  As back-up for her lecture (aka “presentation”), but not needed today was an overhead projector. 

And her students; approximately fourteen females and a solitary male; manually penned notes in spiral notebooks.  The three alumni attending (two women and me), had out our iPads.  We probably thought we were pretty cool.  I bet the students just wondered what the old guy was doing here in the first place! 

So Gary, “What’s the point?” you might ask.  Hey, it’s “political science”, is there ever any point?  Just kidding.  

I guess the point I’m trying to make is that there is great, influential power when someone determines something is “pretty cool”.  But many times that pretty cool something isn’t the “thing” we might think it is. 

Professor Kampwirth didn’t need wiz-bang, YouTube entertainment based, mobile devices, to stimulate engagement from her class.  And she didn’t go down the authoritarian path of “I’m smarter than you”, either.  Nope – she simply used encouragement to engage; gave explicit directions to her participants; and offered clarification as needed.  All to create an environment conducive to learning and more importantly, to understanding.  Pretty cool! 


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Management Lessons…

I recently came upon this clipping from my favorite, Unknown Sage.  Enjoy.

Lesson #1

A crow was sitting on a tree, doing nothing all day. A small rabbit saw the crow, and asked him, “Can I also sit like you and do nothing all day long?”  The crow answered: “Sure, why not.”  So, the rabbit sat on the ground below the crow, and rested.  All of a sudden, a fox appeared, jumped the rabbit and ate it.

Management Learning: 

To be sitting and doing nothing, you must be sitting very, very high up.

Lesson #2

A turkey was chatting with a bull. “I would love to be able to get to the top of that tree,” sighed the turkey, “but I haven’t got the energy.”  “Well, why don’t you nibble on some of my droppings?” replied the bull.  “They’re packed with nutrients.”  The turkey pecked at a lump of dung and found that it actually gave him enough strength to reach the first branch of the tree.  The next day, after eating some more dung, he reached the second branch.  Finally after a fortnight, there he was proudly perched at the top of the tree.  Soon, a farmer promptly spotted him and shot the turkey out of the tree.

Management Learning: 

Bullshit might get you to the top, but it won’t keep you there.

Lesson #3

A little bird was flying south for the winter.  It was so cold; the bird froze and fell to the ground in a large field.  While it was lying there, a cow came by and dropped some dung on it.  As the frozen bird lay there in the pile of cow dung, it began to realize how warm it was.  The dung was actually thawing him out!  He lay there all warm and happy, and soon began to sing for joy.  A passing cat heard the bird singing and came to investigate.  Following the sound, the cat discovered the bird under the pile of cow dung, and promptly dug him out and ate him!

Management Learning:

1) Not everyone who drops crap on you is your enemy.

2) Not everyone who gets you out of crap is your friend.

3) And when you’re in deep do-do, keep your mouth shut!

Lesson #4

The boy rode on the donkey and the old man walked.  As they went long, they passed some people who remarked it was a shame the old man was walking and the boy was riding.  The man and boy thought maybe the critics were right, so they changed positions.  Later, they passed some people that remarked, “What a shame, he makes that little boy walk.”  They decided they both would walk.  Soon they passed some more people who thought they were stupid to walk when they had a decent donkey to ride, so the both rode the donkey.  Now they passed some people that shamed them by saying how awful to put such a load on a poor donkey.  The boy and man said they were probably right so they decided to carry the donkey.  As they crossed a bridge, they lost their grip on the animal and he fell into the river and drowned.

Management Learning: 

If you try to please everyone, you will eventually lose your ass.

How many people do you know who aspire to become “the manager”?  How many of us have already done so?  Careful what we wish for, true?


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